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Trade Talk: The world loves its screen time



Article ID:
20140502
Published:
May 2014, page 8
Author:
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor

Article Abstract

Drawing on his own experiences and a report from Millward Brown, Quirk's Editor Joseph Rydholm explores how consumers around the world are consuming content.

Every weekend, the screens take over my family. Since my wife and I have basically banned our two daughters from any iPod, iPad, laptop, desktop or TV screen time during the school week, weekends around our place are all about media consumption for the girls.

You can’t get them out of bed with a crane on school mornings but somehow on weekends they’re both up at 6:15. While our third-grader plays Animal Jam on the Mac laptop in the kitchen, our youngest sits in the nearby living room watching videos from PBS Kids on our iPad. Other times, older sister will take her iPod downstairs to play games and FaceTime with a neighbor friend while her little sis watches My Little Pony episodes on Netflix.

Not that my wife and I are any different. As I wait for my coffee’s magical properties to kick in, I’m usually poring over the news of the previous evening or debating roster moves in my fantasy sports leagues while my wife grades the homework and discussion-room posts of her distance-learning students.

According to recent research from Millward Brown, scenes like this are being played out all over the world. For its AdReaction Report, the firm surveyed, via smartphone or tablet, more than 12,000 16-to-44-year-old multiscreen users across 30 countries to explore consumer receptivity to advertising on TV, smartphones, laptops and tablets. Multiscreen users were defined as people who own, or have access to, a TV and a smartphone and/or a tablet.

(With this issue’s editorial focus on data analysis and visualization, it’s fitting that Millward Brown has set up a fun, interactive site where you can poke around in the data for each country: www.millwardbrown.com/adreaction/2014/#/.)

As reported in a press release, simultaneous multiscreening accounts for 35 percent of screen time and includes a mix of “meshing” – the use of TV and a second screen for related content (14 percent) – and “stacking” – the use of TV and a second screen for unrelated content (22 percent). At 65 percent of screen time, “shifting” among individual screens throughout the day remains the dominant form of screen use. When consumers port an individual task across screens, they most often begin on TV and move to a smartphone but all screen sequences are possible.

With consumers simultaneously using multiple screens just one-third of the time, marketers’ larger opportunity is delivering consistent, integrated campaigns as users shift between screens, Millward Brown says. Related to specific screens:

TV remains strong for brand-building, and in particular drives salience and affinity. While no longer the most-consumed screen globally, TV delivers strong reach and enjoys the highest advertising receptivity. It does remain the most-used screen in the U.K., France and Spain.

Smartphones are now the most used screen globally. With strong daytime use, smartphones are good for delivering salience, difference and setting trends. Multiscreen users in Nigeria report the highest time spent on smartphones, at more than 193 minutes per day, 31 percent higher than the global average of 147 minutes per day.

Laptops deliver salience and relevance for marketers. Consumers report 108 minutes of use per day on laptops, the majority (71 percent) being exclusive. However, laptops deliver only moderate advertising receptivity. They are the top screen for multiscreeners in Russia, Poland and the Czech Republic.

Tablets deliver difference for brands and nearly half of tablet use (49 percent) is simultaneous with TV. Peaking during the evening, tablets deliver difference but only moderate receptivity. Receptivity to ads on tablets was notably high in Kenya, Nigeria and the Philippines.

Specific to multiscreen marketing opportunities, AdReaction found that consumers are most receptive to micro-video; TV ads with interactivity; and TV ads promoting mobile apps, Facebook pages and Web sites. Marketing that delivers more entertainment and rewards is generally preferred over multiscreen campaigns which simply offer more information.

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