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Marketing Research Articles Related to Brainstorming/Idea Generation

Marketing Research Articles Related to Brainstorming/Idea Generation

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Creativity is lurking inside your company: Do you know how to find it?

Published
February 1998
Author
Michelle Taufman
Abstract
Innovation isn't necessarily born from creative or marketing departments alone. A company's staff members may be just what the company needs for generating ideas. This article discusses internal idea generation, including tips for conducting a successful internal idea generation session.

Online brainstorming

Published
July 1999
Author
Susan Meier Roth
Abstract
Online marketing will help you get closer to your consumers and stay ahead of the competition. Using three case studies, this article discusses the use of MindStorm, an online think tank, to solve a business problem.

Multi-country research aids Cartoon Network's quest for world 'toonification'

Published
April 2000
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
The Cartoon Network used brainstorming with in-house client groups, followed by 250 focus groups in more than 10 countries and face-to-face interviews in Latin America in its quest to be experts on kids and maintain the “think globally, act locally” approach.

Setting the stage for innovative thinking in ideation sessions

Published
May 2001
Author
Sharon Livingston
Abstract
Creativity is often considered an accident or something akin to magic. This article discusses creativity as a process and examines creative problem-solving.

Suggestions on refocusing innovation

Published
December 2003
Authors
Cara Woodland, Robert Morais and Arnold Spector
Abstract
For single-product companies considering moving away from a single-product strategy, there is a challenge for how to do so without killing the brand that has given so much over the years. By way of example, this article provides suggestions on refocusing innovation.

Don't shoot your ideation session in the foot

Published
May 2003
Author
Gregg Fraley
Abstract
There is a growing need in the research industry for consultants who specialize in assisting corporations with new product development. This article discusses nine ways to avoid shooting yourself in the foot as you plan and execute your next ideation session.

Trade Talk: A look at our new look; going ethno in San Fran

Published
January 2004
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Background on the redesign of Quirk’s and a summary of highlights from the ethnographic research-related programming at the 2004 IIR Market Research Event.

How one company found ways to innovate in the midst of reorganization

Published
May 2006
Authors
Cara Woodland, Katie Steffy and Andrea Birkett
Abstract
In the midst of a massive reorganization process, one company found a way to use brainstorming techniques to develop new product ideas.

Qualitatively Speaking: Involving kids in the creative process is the name of the game

Published
February 2005
Author
Tina Pragoff
Abstract
Kids have open minds, which are perfect for the process of innovation and brainstorming. Tips are provided on how to find the best kids for the job and how adult facilitators can maximize the kids’ abilities.

Using ethnography to spark new product ideas

Published
December 2005
Author
Hy Mariampolski
Abstract
Watching consumers interact with products can lead to new product ideas by observing consumers’ frustrations and workarounds with current products.

Want better product ideas? Try smart incentives

Published
November 2005
Author
Rajan Sambandam
Abstract
The article argues for the use of smart incentives, which reward respondents for coming up with the best ideas.

Where will your company’s next great idea come from? From your customers.

Published
July 2007
Authors
Mike Waite and Emily Morris
Abstract
Collaborating with customers, through online communities, offers a new and exciting way to develop new product ideas. The authors present examples from Del Monte Foods and its research with pet owners and from a toy manufacturer and snack-food maker.

Using role play and guided imagery for concept generation

Published
December 2007
Author
Mark Shekoyan
Abstract
For designers of new products, the author recommends conducting role play exercises in which the participants put themselves in the users’ shoes. By paying attention to physical and emotional reactions to situations encountered during the role play, designers can create products that that really serve users’ needs.

Qualitatively Speaking: Involving your core users

Published
December 2007
Author
Laura Morris
Abstract
Lego and other firms have profited from getting key customer groups involved in product development. This approach can lead to creating products that have a built-in audience as well as generating goodwill among core users of your products.

Hilton uses research in creation of vacation promotion

Published
June 1989
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Hilton Hotels Corp. conducted a telephone survey of 1000 adults regarding their weekend leisure and work habits in the development of its BounceBack Weekend vacation program.

Make sure your product innovations serve consumer interests, not corporate ones

Published
January 2009
Author
Barb Gasper
Abstract
For companies in search of innovation help, the author provides several hard-won tips, including: make sure your innovations fit your brand’s strategy; identify specific and compelling consumer problems to solve, not just mere annoyances; get everyone actively involved in the process – watch how consumers live with and use existing products.

How market researchers can aid corporate innovation

Published
February 2009
Author
Gregg Fraley
Abstract
Rather than relying on a one-size-fits-all process or an in-house champion to lead innovation initiatives, the author argues that companies must make the support of and quest for innovation an ongoing part of how they do business every day. He outlines how marketing researchers can help move their organizations toward that goal.

Trade Talk: How the strong retailers are surviving

Published
April 2009
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
A report by Kurt Salmon Associates details how companies such as Apple and Trader Joe's have created product and service offerings that resonate with consumers. These retailers share certain operational competencies, which the report explores.

Adding ‘prosumers’ to your groups can provide a creative boost

Published
May 2009
Author
Steve Richardson
Abstract
Under the right circumstances, including - rather than excluding - marketing professionals normally screened out of focus groups can lead to breakthroughs. Examples from British Airways and WD-40 are cited to illustrate how this approach has helped develop new products and services.

Segmentation, focus groups and in-market testing helped develop the CardLock fraud prevention product

Published
October 2010
Authors
Mark Sandler and Chris Slane
Abstract
Prior to rollout of its CardLock product, PSCU Financial Services conducted research with consumers on the topic of fraud prevention to make sure they valued the product’s features and capabilities.