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Marketing Research Articles Related to Brand/Image Development

Marketing Research Articles Related to Brand/Image Development

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Focus groups guide Pevely's brand positioning

Published
December 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Researchers used focus groups to help Pevely Dairy Company discover how to further develop its brand to appeal to consumers. Focus group participants shared their reactions to potential prototypes.

Trade Talk: Study uncovers America's most powerful brands

Published
December 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
This month's column reviews the top 10 most powerful brands in America and what attributes they share.

Custom store audits

Published
January 1989
Author
Al Goldsmith
Abstract
While the introduction of scanner equipment has proved useful in sales information collection, it does not provide a complete picture. This article discusses the value of custom store audits as an alternative for collecting information beyond sales data.

Data Use: Getting the most from your paired preference testing

Published
January 1989
Author
Mark J. Moody
Abstract
Blinded product—paired—preference testing is a common marketing research technique. Using an example, this article addresses how to best conduct paired product preference testing to avoid ambiguous results, which includes repeating the pair testing with respondents and conducting a binomial test statistically.

Distill complexity: perceptual maps bring it all together

Published
February 1989
Authors
Harris Goldstein and Peter Zandan
Abstract
Managing marketplace perceptions is a key component to successful marketing. Research professionals must communicate the complex information that comprises brand image so that management can make informed decisions. This article discusses the usefulness of perceptual maps in this endeavor.

Testing product names

Published
March 1989
Author
Ira N. Bachrach
Abstract
Name function tests aren’t really about names but the effect of the name on the consumer’s expectations of the product. This article—an excerpt from a chapter in the book Making Names—discusses using adjectival analysis to compare consumers’ expectations of a product with one name versus expectations of the same product with another name.

Trade Talk: Brand names offer emotional and psychological benefits

Published
July 1989
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
This article discusses the insights regarding brand names discovered by DDB Needham Worldwide as a result of its annual Life Style study.

Focus groups shape successful ad campaign for Oasis Laundries

Published
July 1989
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
After using customer feedback to better its product, Oasis Laundries used focus groups with multiple target customer types to develop its ad campaign. Customer surveys are used on an ongoing basis to determine location-specific preferences.

Research encourages a comprehensive redesign of Blue Nun packaging

Published
October 1989
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
After conducting taste tests that confirmed that packaging was a factor in declining sales, Blue Nun wine held extensive focus groups with current and past consumers and competitive brand purchasers, as well as shelf tests, in its package re-design process.

Using tachistoscope, semantic differential and preference tests in package design assessment

Published
October 1989
Author
Donald Marich
Abstract
Taken from the book Handbook of Package Design Research, this article discusses a research methodology that measures consumer response to test package/label designs in terms of three decision criteria: impact, imagery, and preference.

Research helps Boy Scouts of America communicate an active, adventurous image

Published
December 1989
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Boy Scouts of America used focus groups with former Cub Scouts and their mothers, along with ongoing tracking research, in the development of a marketing campaign that would increase awareness that Boy Scouting is an activity-oriented program that differs in many respects from Cub Scouting.

Research and a strong marketing campaign keep Copper Mountain's business hot

Published
March 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Copper Mountain conducted one-on-one interviews with skiers on a chairlift ride to solicit impressions of service areas, to find out about skiing preferences, and to determine awareness of advertising. To delve deeper into perceptions of Copper Mountain and other ski areas and test a potential marketing campaign, it also held focus groups with a number of skiers who had taken the lift survey.

Consumers give Mannington a winning formula for new vinyl flooring product

Published
May 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Mannington Resilient Floors used several research strategies to develop its successful flooring product. In addition to a telephone survey, Mannington used HTI Custom Research's monthly mail omnibus study to determine some basic purchase dynamics and the demographics of purchasers of floor coverings. Consumers were asked about their level of satisfaction with different kinds of floor coverings and what the coverings’ strong and weak points were. Mannington also studied retailers and others in the trade to gauge perceptions compared to its competitors and to determine how to increase and improve its industry profile.

Research helps a rural Arizona hospital through a bond election and beyond

Published
January 1992
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To determine its marketing efforts, Yavapai Regional Medical Center in Prescott, Ariz., uses a regular cycle of surveys to gauge community awareness and perceptions of the hospital. In addition to surveying community members, it also conducted patient satisfaction surveys.

Research with consumers points the way to personifying Mr. Coffee for a new advertising campaign

Published
March 1992
Authors
David M. Morawski and Lacey J. Zachary
Abstract
Mr. Coffee conducted research to develop and monitor the Mr. Coffee brand personification campaign. The company used a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods, including focus groups, nationally-distributed questionnaires, in-house interviews and a tracking study with a national sample of over 1,000 participants.

Focus groups tell Ethan Allen its redesigned logo stylishly combines the old and the new

Published
November 1992
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Ethan Allen conducted focus groups to create a logo that communicated the changes at Ethan Allen while preserving existing customer loyalty. The focus groups gathered input from long-term customers, recent customers and potential customers.

Beyond human oddities: how to mine consumer brains to build powerful brands

Published
May 1998
Author
Tracy Teweles
Abstract
Consumers have relationships with brands and categories. This article discusses the consumer-product/category interaction and how to measure underlying category and brand experience in order to strengthen brands.

Advertising: today's sale or brand-building for tomorrow?

Published
May 2000
Author
Margaret H. Blair
Abstract
This article reviews the empirical evidence that demonstrates that there is no such thing as brand building for tomorrow without brand building and sales today. The article examines definitions, branding today and tomorrow, a branding model and case studies.

Creating loyalty on the Web

Published
February 2001
Author
Robert Passikoff
Abstract
Brands have grown in importance over the decades. This article discusses brands and branding, including defining brand equity, measuring e-brand equity, and an example.

What to look for in developing global brand advertising

Published
November 2003
Author
Charles Young
Abstract
This article discusses global brand advertising development, including creative options and international barriers to universal executional effectiveness.