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Marketing Research Articles Related to Business-To-Business Research

Marketing Research Articles Related to Business-To-Business Research

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Tennant fine-tunes its business-to-business research

Published
February 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
For many industrial manufacturers, marketing is based on "pushing" customers into buying a product and then moving on to the next likely customer. Tennant, a manufacturer of floor maintenance equipment, refined its marketing techniques to "pull" customers in by meeting needs and expectations. The shift has improved customer satisfaction.

Pitney Bowes personalizes its business-to-business research

Published
February 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Pitney Bowes, a supplier of shipping and mailing equipment, surveys thousands of customers every six months in order to remain competitive in the worldwide marketplace.

Research method tests boundaries of conventional wisdom

Published
February 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
While many qualitative research techniques reject experts from the field, a new technique, Delphi, is breaking new ground for market research by utilizing expert knowledge. The strategy has risks, but Delphi is helping clients access new information.

The strategic value of business advertising research

Published
April 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
The authors draw from a survey of ad research professionals to examine trends in business advertising research, including methods used, benefits received and problems encountered.

10 steps to improve business/industrial research

Published
February 1988
Author
Margaret Morich
Abstract
The most successful product manufacturers are often the best market researchers too. Margaret F. Morich, co-founder of Consumer & Professional Research Inc., outlines 10 suggestions on how to improve B2B research projects.

McGraw-Hill shows it's the place to get market information

Published
February 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
McGraw-Hill, publishers of Electrical Construction & Maintenance magazine and Electrical Wholesaling magazine know the value of market research. Using a variety of techniques, including mailed questionnaires and telephone surveys, the company gathers information for the editorial and advertising sections of the McGraw-Hill magazines.

Syndicated study tracks trends in office furniture

Published
August 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Kennedy Research Inc. conducts a quarterly Office Trends study to gain insights and information on the office industry. The firm mails a questionnaire to participants from a panel of key industry experts drawn primarily from top dealers, contractors, general managers, design firms, architects and Fortune 500 companies. The article describes the key questions in the study and highlights how three companies have used the results in their businesses.

Focus groups aid positioning of new boiler control technology

Published
April 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To determine how to market a new boiler system technology and identify the target audience, Cleaver-Brooks conducted focus groups with prospective buyers from a variety of industries and applications, such as hospitals, manufacturing plants, schools and universities. Via an earpiece, the moderator received coaching from company observers throughout the focus group process to ask follow-up probing question or to rephrase questions. Field tests with sample customers were also completed.

In-depth interviews with dealers yield many benefits for farm equipment manufacturer

Published
April 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Farm equipment manufacturer the Gehl Company conducted in-depth interviews with dealers from around the country that were selected to be part of its dealer council. Council members distributed forms to dealers in their area to identify concerns to bring to the dealer council meeting. The company used this council input to determine priorities for the coming year.

Uses and misuses of business-to-business focus groups

Published
April 1990
Author
Alan Zimmerman
Abstract
This article summarizes several common mistakes commonly made in the design of business-to-business focus groups and provides guidance on when to use focus groups as well as best practices strategies when choosing this qualitative research method. The article offers a number of examples of how specific businesses have successfully used focus groups.

Focus groups tell California-based mountain bike maker its ad campaign is a winner

Published
March 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To develop a new advertising strategy to apply to market its mountain bikes. Specialized Bicycle Components Inc. conducted one-on-one interviews with employees about what they thought about mountain bike advertising in the industry magazines It then used focus groups with current and prospective riders to determine their psychological makeup and test its new marketing brochure.

Reports assess effectiveness of business publication advertising

Published
March 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Cahners Research surveyed recipients of Cahners Advertising Research Reports (CARR) to analyze the effectiveness of business publication advertising. It analyzed the data to determine how various advertising strategies affected the “Remember Seeing” scores. Such strategies included using various sized ads or cover placement, using inserts, offering coupons and including or excluding price.

Reader survey helps new magazine keep up with changes in the recording industry

Published
May 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To identify audience interest and needs for EQ, a music recording publication, researchers mailed a survey to potential readers. The study inventoried advertisements in industry publications to estimate the potential market share and it employed informal interviews with industry contacts to ascertain the market potential. The researchers also tested potential titles by asking regional and national distributors to respond to dummy magazine covers.

Research helps maker of gardening containers expand its product line

Published
October 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
To determine the marketing potential of an indoor planter product, researchers applied a variety of research methods: a review secondary research, trade publications and sales materials; retail audits; in-store interviews; consumer and trade member interviews; and telephone interviews with retail buyers and distributors.

Retooling the focus group to business-to-business research

Published
April 1991
Author
Daniel Oromaner
Abstract
This article discusses five key areas of difference between industrial and consumer qualitative research projects: specialized recruitment, limited populations, confidentiality, subject matter expertise and dominant group members. The author offers potential strategies for challenges associated with business-to-business focus groups.

Research and marketing breathe new life into a mature product

Published
April 1991
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Indiana Bell used focus groups of small business representatives to determine an appropriate advertising strategy for its Centrex product. The company then tested three different marketing approaches in three different markets and then measured the associated response rates in the markets as well as consumer attitudes pre- and post-marketing via survey research.

Research instrumental in creating system for measuring reader feelings about B2B publications

Published
April 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Cahners Publications and Simmons Market Research Bureau developed Affinity Index, a method of measuring the intensity of the relationship readers have with the publications that serve their respective industries. By quantifying reader feelings, the Affinity Index lets publications go a step beyond the usual methods of explaining their readership to advertisers: circulation numbers and/or demographics. To determine a magazine's Affinity Index, questionnaires are mailed to a sampling of its readers.

Defining the system of needs in an industrial market

Published
April 1991
Author
Cliff Havener
Abstract
Researchers conducted needs research by interviewing individuals with influence upon purchasing decisions for an air compressor product in their companies. The article discusses the interviewing strategies that led from a discussion of the broader context to specific questions about the product and problems with it.

Strategic marketing and marketing research

Published
January 1991
Author
G.E. Cressman
Abstract
This article asserts that the active involvement of market research throughout the strategic managing process to achieve business success. Market research can help businesses make critical choices about potential markets, industries, customers, offerings and resource allocation.

Consumers give Mannington a winning formula for new vinyl flooring product

Published
May 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Mannington Resilient Floors used several research strategies to develop its successful flooring product. In addition to a telephone survey, Mannington used HTI Custom Research's monthly mail omnibus study to determine some basic purchase dynamics and the demographics of purchasers of floor coverings. Consumers were asked about their level of satisfaction with different kinds of floor coverings and what the coverings’ strong and weak points were. Mannington also studied retailers and others in the trade to gauge perceptions compared to its competitors and to determine how to increase and improve its industry profile.