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Marketing Research Articles Related to Business-To-Business Research

Marketing Research Articles Related to Business-To-Business Research

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Tennant fine-tunes its business-to-business research

Published
February 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
For many industrial manufacturers, marketing is based on "pushing" customers into buying a product and then moving on to the next likely customer. Tennant, a manufacturer of floor maintenance equipment, refined its marketing techniques to "pull" customers in by meeting needs and expectations. The shift has improved customer satisfaction.

Pitney Bowes personalizes its business-to-business research

Published
February 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Pitney Bowes, a supplier of shipping and mailing equipment, surveys thousands of customers every six months in order to remain competitive in the worldwide marketplace.

Research method tests boundaries of conventional wisdom

Published
February 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
While many qualitative research techniques reject experts from the field, a new technique, Delphi, is breaking new ground for market research by utilizing expert knowledge. The strategy has risks, but Delphi is helping clients access new information.

Trade Talk: Audit helps businesses measure their ethical climate

Published
March 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Focus groups and survey research were instrumental in conducting studies to assess attitudes toward business ethics.

10 steps to improve business/industrial research

Published
February 1988
Author
Margaret Morich
Abstract
The most successful product manufacturers are often the best market researchers too. Margaret F. Morich, co-founder of Consumer & Professional Research Inc., outlines 10 suggestions on how to improve B2B research projects.

McGraw-Hill shows it's the place to get market information

Published
February 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
McGraw-Hill, publishers of Electrical Construction & Maintenance magazine and Electrical Wholesaling magazine know the value of market research. Using a variety of techniques, including mailed questionnaires and telephone surveys, the company gathers information for the editorial and advertising sections of the McGraw-Hill magazines.

The strategic value of business advertising research

Published
April 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
The authors draw from a survey of ad research professionals to examine trends in business advertising research, including methods used, benefits received and problems encountered.

From the Publisher May 1988: Focus groups for business-to-business research

Published
May 1988
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Tom Quirk recounts his experience conducting B2B focus groups for new product research and attributes the project's success to careful recruiting and modertating.

How to effectively present marketing research results

Published
January 1989
Author
N. Carroll Mohn
Abstract
Improving the quality of presentations is an important goal for professional marketing researchers. This article summarizes skills for five basic presentation assignments faced by researchers both inside and outside their organizations. Coverage begins with the common briefing - a straightforward presentation with the purpose to inform.

Reports provide data on effectiveness of print advertising

Published
April 1989
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
McGraw-Hill Research’s Laboratory of Advertising Performance has developed considerable information on the effectiveness of print advertising. This article highlights some of that data.

A survey of scanner data users finds problems with data analysis, assimilation

Published
November 1989
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Temple, Barker & Sloane, Inc. interviewed research management personnel in 51 U.S. consumer products firms to gain an understanding of how firms use scanner tools and data and their expectations of and satisfaction with scanner data. This article provides information discovered in that research.

The rules change when conducting focus groups for business to business research

Published
December 1989
Author
Nick Calo
Abstract
Given the idea that “people are people,” one might assume that the strategies used for consumer focus groups would apply to business-to-business focus groups, but this is not the case. This article offers strategies and considerations for conducting business-to-business focus groups, including playing dumb, allowing the client in the group room, anonymity, confidentiality and a quantitative follow-up.

Qualities of a Master Moderator

Published
December 1989
Author
Naomi R. Henderson
Abstract
A key element in focus group success is the moderator. This article focuses on qualities of “Master Moderators”—those who have mastered the key skills and techniques that lead to effective group interactions.

Focus groups tell California-based mountain bike maker its ad campaign is a winner

Published
March 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To develop a new advertising strategy to apply to market its mountain bikes. Specialized Bicycle Components Inc. conducted one-on-one interviews with employees about what they thought about mountain bike advertising in the industry magazines It then used focus groups with current and prospective riders to determine their psychological makeup and test its new marketing brochure.

Reports assess effectiveness of business publication advertising

Published
March 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Cahners Research surveyed recipients of Cahners Advertising Research Reports (CARR) to analyze the effectiveness of business publication advertising. It analyzed the data to determine how various advertising strategies affected the “Remember Seeing” scores. Such strategies included using various sized ads or cover placement, using inserts, offering coupons and including or excluding price.

Focus groups aid positioning of new boiler control technology

Published
April 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To determine how to market a new boiler system technology and identify the target audience, Cleaver-Brooks conducted focus groups with prospective buyers from a variety of industries and applications, such as hospitals, manufacturing plants, schools and universities. Via an earpiece, the moderator received coaching from company observers throughout the focus group process to ask follow-up probing question or to rephrase questions. Field tests with sample customers were also completed.

In-depth interviews with dealers yield many benefits for farm equipment manufacturer

Published
April 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Farm equipment manufacturer the Gehl Company conducted in-depth interviews with dealers from around the country that were selected to be part of its dealer council. Council members distributed forms to dealers in their area to identify concerns to bring to the dealer council meeting. The company used this council input to determine priorities for the coming year.

Uses and misuses of business-to-business focus groups

Published
April 1990
Author
Alan Zimmerman
Abstract
This article summarizes several common mistakes commonly made in the design of business-to-business focus groups and provides guidance on when to use focus groups as well as best practices strategies when choosing this qualitative research method. The article offers a number of examples of how specific businesses have successfully used focus groups.

Reader survey helps new magazine keep up with changes in the recording industry

Published
May 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To identify audience interest and needs for EQ, a music recording publication, researchers mailed a survey to potential readers. The study inventoried advertisements in industry publications to estimate the potential market share and it employed informal interviews with industry contacts to ascertain the market potential. The researchers also tested potential titles by asking regional and national distributors to respond to dummy magazine covers.

Research helps maker of gardening containers expand its product line

Published
October 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
To determine the marketing potential of an indoor planter product, researchers applied a variety of research methods: a review secondary research, trade publications and sales materials; retail audits; in-store interviews; consumer and trade member interviews; and telephone interviews with retail buyers and distributors.