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Marketing Research Articles Related to Researching Children

Marketing Research Articles Related to Researching Children

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Ignore mom when doing children research

Published
December 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
When conducting interviews with children, Karen Forcade, president of the Youth Research division at Consumer Sciences Inc., (CSI) Brookfield Center, Conn. insists that the best interviews are the ones without parents. Inviting parents into interviews will influence the children, making the interview less effective.

Child-adult qualitative designs yield richest data

Published
December 1987
Author
Diane Fraley
Abstract
The study of children as consumers is a complicated but valuable task. Child-centric product design tests and other qualitative research can yield rich data, but Diane Fraley of D.S. Fraley & Associates in Chicago knows that expertise is needed.

Conducting qualitative research with children

Published
March 1988
Authors
Dana Blackwell and Brett Blackwell
Abstract
Children are able to give honest and open answers for market research, but child research can be a serious and sometimes difficult task. The author provides some aspects to think about when conducting child research.

Enhancing market research with kids

Published
November 1994
Author
Art Shulman
Abstract
Market research with kids isn’t the same as market research with adults: you can’t simply make the adult questions smaller. This article offers tips for conducting research with kids, including dealing with shyness, cognitive development considerations, working with different age groups and sexes, using video, rating and ranking, and interviewing parents.

Children's qualitative research past and present

Published
December 1996
Author
Lynn Kaladjian
Abstract
The children's market has developed rapidly. This article discusses qualitative research considerations when working with children.

Focus groups with kids . . imagine

Published
December 1996
Author
Karen M. Forcade
Abstract
Qualitative research with children is quite different from that with adults. This article discusses five techniques for working with children in focus groups.

Teens respond well to online research on games

Published
December 1996
Author
Carla Sarett
Abstract
The Internet poses exciting new research possibilities. Chilton Research Services used an online panel of 11-to-18-year-olds to collect data on the general area of technology and media as well as computer games and on-line gaming.

Multi-country research aids Cartoon Network's quest for world 'toonification'

Published
April 2000
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
The Cartoon Network used brainstorming with in-house client groups, followed by 250 focus groups in more than 10 countries and face-to-face interviews in Latin America in its quest to be experts on kids and maintain the “think globally, act locally” approach.

Understanding European youth

Published
November 2000
Authors
Carl Rohde and Ole Christensen
Abstract
The world of children and teenagers has changed a great deal during the last decade. In order to get a better understanding of young people in Europe, GfK Europe Ad hoc Research has established a continuous tracking survey entitled “Hopes and Fears: Young European Opinion Leaders.” This article discusses the survey, including its methodology, objectives and findings.

Research uncovers new markets, new directions for Coleman

Published
December 2001
Author
Cara Woodland
Abstract
Coleman used a variety of qualitative research techniques to find new areas of business and revenue.

Trade Talk: Some new possibilities for your library

Published
April 2002
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
This article reviews five recent books: First Among Equals—How to Manage a Group of Professionals; Stakeholder Power; Defining Markets, Defining Moments; The Great Tween Buying Machine; and Customer-Centric Product Definition.

KidsCom enlists its audience’s help in shaping site avatars

Published
February 2004
Author
Sally Schmidt
Abstract
The KidsCom.com edutainment Web site used online research with a panel of kids to help refine a series of characters who inhabit the site. The characters’ personalities and traits were examined and rated.

Getting kids to notice your brand

Published
February 2004
Author
Martin Lindstrom
Abstract
Companies wishing to attract the attention of tween consumers must throw out their ideas of conventional marketing and embrace a new, 24/7 approach. Based on research with tweens across the world, the author explores some successful tween-aimed marketing programs and offers advice on how marketers can create their own buzz with this important audience.

Consumer Electronics Association uses online qualitative to get the 411 on kids and their phones

Published
February 2006
Author
Tara Hutton
Abstract
A week-long online study, in which respondents used blogs to record their phone usage and related experiences, helped the Consumer Electronics Association see how important cell phones are to pre-teen and teenaged kids.

Tips on moderating focus groups with children

Published
May 2006
Author
Tyler J. Walker
Abstract
Focus groups with kids can be fun but moderators must have a game plan going in. Listening skills and the ability to ask clear and simple questions are key.

Research lays foundation for hospital’s non-traditional ad campaign

Published
June 2006
Author
Robin Segbers
Abstract
Akron Children’s Hospital used telephone research and focus groups to determine the most effective messages to communicate in a new ad campaign. The hospital’s clinical excellence in high-acuity service areas was chosen as one of the attributes to promote.

Online methods are a natural way to research Web-savvy kids

Published
July 2006
Author
Robin Hilton
Abstract
Teenagers are very comfortable in the online space, making Web-based methods a natural option for conducting research with teens. The author explores some of his firm’s experiences with online qualitative and discusses the kinds of insights they produced.

Marketing to the new generation of techno kids

Published
July 2006
Author
Ted Mininni
Abstract
Web- and tech-savvy kids are reachable via marketing, but companies must take care when developing their promotional methods. Kids value quality, innovation and ease of use, among other attributes, in the products and services they choose to use.

Food marketing to tweens and teens

Published
February 2005
Author
Ted Mininni
Abstract
Examines the effects that mothers and teens have on each other as buyers and consumers of products.

Qualitatively Speaking: Involving kids in the creative process is the name of the game

Published
February 2005
Author
Tina Pragoff
Abstract
Kids have open minds, which are perfect for the process of innovation and brainstorming. Tips are provided on how to find the best kids for the job and how adult facilitators can maximize the kids’ abilities.