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Marketing Research Articles Related to Conjoint Analysis/Trade-Off Analysis

Marketing Research Articles Related to Conjoint Analysis/Trade-Off Analysis

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A look at the buying process model

Published
June 2009
Author
Sharon S. Paik
Abstract
This article explains a method called the buying process approach, which helps pharmaceutical firms closely examine how patients move through the health care system. By identifying areas where problems occur and understanding how those problems affect patients’ use of health care brands, marketers can design strategies to overcome roadblocks.

Adapting quantitative techniques to qualitative research

Published
December 2002
Author
Alan Kornheiser
Abstract
Once-academic techniques have become increasingly common in everyday quantitative market research. This article discusses three multivariate techniques that have been adapted for qualitative research: conjoint analysis, cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling.

Assessing the monetary value of attribute levels with conjoint analysis: warnings and suggestions

Published
May 2001
Author
Bryan Orme
Abstract
Conjoint analysis is often used to assess how buyers trade off product features with price. This article reviews a common technique for converting conjoint utilities to a monetary scale and suggests a better approach.

Benefit impact analysis

Published
January 1995
Author
Ed Cohen
Abstract
Conjoint analysis is incredibly useful to managers. This article outlines benefit impact analysis, a relatively simple technique for exploring product elements that produces a measure analogous to conjoint’s utility values in lieu of conjoint analysis.

Best practices for key driver analysis

Published
February 2014
Author
Kevin Gray
Abstract
Key driver analysis is a versatile tool in the marketing research toolkit and can help clients uncover what is most important to consumers in a product or service category and understand where to focus their priorities.

By the Numbers: How to improve your segmentations with max-diff

Published
November 2009
Author
Rajan Sambandam
Abstract
The author uses a checking-account example to show how maximum difference scaling, or max-diff, can deliver finely-tuned segmentations without subjecting respondents to an onerous number of comparison questions.

By the Numbers: Practices you can trust

Published
July 2004
Author
Lee Smith
Abstract
An overview of the use of online conjoint analysis and its capabilities.

Cable companies must listen to customers if they hope to survive in a rapidly changing market

Published
October 1995
Authors
Richard Schreuer, Polly Staman and Jim Higgins
Abstract
With increasing competition, cable companies must be more proactive and dynamic to be successful. Customer loyalty is key to success. This article discusses how cable companies must act regarding customer loyalty. In addition to noting the information cable companies need to obtain, this article provides a case study that shows how one cable system used an innovative application of conjoint analysis in its research.

Conducting full-profile conjoint analysis over the Internet

Published
July 1998
Authors
Bryan Orme and W. Christopher King
Abstract
This article discusses pros and cons of various types of text-based e-mail surveys and online surveys. It also reports on an online full-profile conjoint survey dealing with credit card preferences. This study used an Internet survey to compare the pairwise and single-concept approach for computerized FP conjoint analysis.

Conjoint analysis enhances computer-based interviews

Published
March 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
By employing interactive software, conjoint analysis increases the effectiveness of computer-based interviewing. The results have helped businesses to better understand the marketplace with accurate data.

Conjoint analysis in pharmaceutical marketing research

Published
June 2001
Authors
Gang Xu and Yilian Yuan
Abstract
Conjoint analysis is a technique that evaluates the importance of a product’s attributes to consumers. This article details how to use conjoint analysis in pharmaceutical marketing research, including design, data analysis, validation, simulating market share and limitations of the technique.

Conjoint analysis valuable in business-to-business research

Published
April 1996
Author
William Ducker
Abstract
Conjoint analysis is popular in consumer marketing research. This article discusses conjoint analysis, a sophisticated form of trade-off analysis found to be particularly effective in studies involving product development strategies that are technical.

Consumers give Mannington a winning formula for new vinyl flooring product

Published
May 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Mannington Resilient Floors used several research strategies to develop its successful flooring product. In addition to a telephone survey, Mannington used HTI Custom Research's monthly mail omnibus study to determine some basic purchase dynamics and the demographics of purchasers of floor coverings. Consumers were asked about their level of satisfaction with different kinds of floor coverings and what the coverings’ strong and weak points were. Mannington also studied retailers and others in the trade to gauge perceptions compared to its competitors and to determine how to increase and improve its industry profile.

Data Use: A good choice for choice modeling

Published
January 2010
Author
Michael Lieberman
Abstract
Maximum difference scaling lets researchers present respondents with large numbers of choice options without making the process onerous. The article uses examples of a hotel loyalty program and restaurant menu optimization to show the technique in action.

Data Use: A look inside the choice-modeling toolbox

Published
February 2013
Author
Michael Lieberman
Abstract
An overview of five common choice models employed in marketing research.

Data Use: A short history of conjoint analysis

Published
July 2004
Author
Bryan Orme
Abstract
From the early 1960s to today, the author charts the growth of and change to the practice of conjoint analysis.

Data Use: Adaptive choice is a good choice

Published
July 2011
Author
Michael S. Garver
Abstract
Using an example of a transportation company client, the author outlines why adaptive choice-based conjoint analysis is a useful tool for developing market segmentations.

Data Use: Best practices for well-differentiated questionnaire data

Published
May 2011
Author
Vince Raimondi
Abstract
How longer point scales, alternate labeling of scale points and other strategies can help you wring more meaning from your data.

Data Use: Conjoint evolves into discrete choice modeling

Published
October 1990
Author
Robert Roy
Abstract
This article profiles discrete choice modeling which, unlike conjoint modeling, does not require pairing of all attributes. Therefore, unrealistic products are not produced. The respondent does not rate, sort or rank-order, but instead acts as if he or she is in the marketplace, selecting which product to buy.

Data Use: Determining product feature price sensitivities

Published
November 1990
Author
Joseph Curry
Abstract
This article discusses several approaches to determining customer price sensitivities – analyzing actual sales as a function of price, laboratory purchase experiments and preference studies where buyers are asked to express their purchase likelihoods for a product at various price levels. The article then describes the use and advantages of a form of conjoint analysis that allows researchers to estimate both feature prices and the overall price in order to better measure price sensitivities of consumers.