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Marketing Research Articles Related to Customer Satisfaction Studies

Marketing Research Articles Related to Customer Satisfaction Studies

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JCPenney pinpoints its customers

Published
October 1986
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
In order to fully understand the needs of their customers, JCPenney has initiated a series of studies called Consumer Feedback. These studies give JCPenney a clear picture of the needs, attitudes and behaviors of their customers.

Research aids in growth, success of church

Published
January 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Wooddale Church in Eden Prairie, Minn., is proof that market research and a desire to be consumer-driven have a place in religion.

Tennant fine-tunes its business-to-business research

Published
February 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
For many industrial manufacturers, marketing is based on "pushing" customers into buying a product and then moving on to the next likely customer. Tennant, a manufacturer of floor maintenance equipment, refined its marketing techniques to "pull" customers in by meeting needs and expectations. The shift has improved customer satisfaction.

Research boosts knowledge of laser surgery

Published
July 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Patients can have a hard time keeping up with the latest trends in the health care industry, so when Kendrick Colon & Rectal Associates, an Indiana-based outpatient group practice, introduced a new form of laser surgery, many people who could have benefited were left unaware. After surveying both staff and patients, the company launched print advertisements and patient brochures that increased awareness of the new procedure.

Health care research valuable, underutilized

Published
April 1988
Author
Hale T. Chan
Abstract
"Probably one of the most neglected parts of marketing in today's health care industry," according industry expert Hale T. Chan, "is the area of market research." As the corporate director of marketing at St. Mary of Nazareth Hospital, Chicago, Chan has used mail questionnaires and patient satisfaction surveys to develop more effective planning and promotional strategies.

Attitude surveys keep phone company in touch

Published
June 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Southwestern Bell Telephone Company uses its Customer Attitude Survey (CAS) to determine customer perceptions about the company and strategize key areas to improve the success of the company. What sets CAS apart from other research techniques is that customers participated in the design of the survey. When areas that need more in-depth research are identified through CAS, focus groups are conducted.

GTE tracks business customer approval with BCGS

Published
February 1989
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Customers don’t always let businesses know they are dissatisfied. GTE implemented two survey programs, using both quantitative and qualitative research to track customer satisfaction levels on an on-going basis.

Leaving an HMO: What does the member remember?

Published
June 1989
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
KCA Research Inc. recently conducted a telephone survey for a group practice model HMO to determine why members who had voluntarily terminated had made that decision. The 300 members contacted provided interesting results, particularly in terms of the number of them who did not recall switching health plans in the previous year.

A survey of scanner data users finds problems with data analysis, assimilation

Published
November 1989
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Temple, Barker & Sloane, Inc. interviewed research management personnel in 51 U.S. consumer products firms to gain an understanding of how firms use scanner tools and data and their expectations of and satisfaction with scanner data. This article provides information discovered in that research.

Focus groups tell Standard Register that service is most important

Published
December 1989
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Standard Register used internal focus groups with management and external groups with clients in the development of its advertising campaign. Information obtained via this research has also resulted in a new company-wide commitment to service.

Utilities discovering the value of customer satisfaction research

Published
November 1990
Author
Judith Karten

A look at the customer survey process at Caterpillar Inc.

Published
November 1990
Author
Brett Blackwell
Abstract
Caterpillar Inc. conducted focus groups and mailed surveys to determine its customers’ perception of product quality and potential areas for improvement.

Federal Express uses an ongoing study to track customer satisfaction

Published
November 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Federal Express interviewed customers about a wide variety of services and mailed surveys to customers to explore a narrower set of services in more depth. These methods were part of the company’s ongoing customer satisfaction study. The company also internally monitored its performance in a number of service areas as part of its Service Quality Indicator program, tracking issues such as the incidence of packages delivered late or on the wrong day.

From the Publisher November 1990: One company's experience with customer satisfaction

Published
November 1990
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Tom Quirk describes how a hybrid approach of focus groups and quantitative questionnaires can help yield useful customer satisfaction data.

Trade Talk: Quality should be Job One

Published
November 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Quality and service are tops and only becoming more important to consumers. Companies should focus on a customer satisfaction program to increase market share and sales.

Speed dialing

Published
December 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Sprint conducted focus groups with residential and business customer segments to make sure its customer satisfaction tracking program would measure service attributes that were important to customers. That information was used to construct the telephone surveys with its customers. For customers that express specific complaints during the telephone survey, the interviewer electronically sends the comments to Sprint for follow-up action that responds to that particular customer.

Patients tell a New York hospital that its service matches its strong reputation

Published
January 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Discharged patients from Belleview Hospital were contacted by telephone two weeks after the end of their stay to take a three-minute patient satisfaction survey on their impressions of the hospital's service. The survey included categorical, interval-scale, and open-ended questions. Results from phone survey will be used to refine its written survey distributed to patients.

CSi program helps GM dealers monitor customer satisfaction

Published
February 1991
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
General Motors sent buyers of new GM cars and trucks a mailed customer satisfaction survey six months after the purchase of their vehicle to measure customer satisfaction with the services of the dealer who sold the car or truck and satisfaction with the vehicle. Survey results were tabulated and reported monthly to each dealer as part of GM's Customer Satisfaction Index (CSi) program.

Trade Talk: Study seeks to define quality

Published
October 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
An EQUITREND study endeavors to understand the complex components of quality, including sophistication, wholesomeness, wide acceptance and trendiness or stylishness.

Ongoing customer satisfaction research helps Hampton Inns guarantee good service

Published
November 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
The Hampton Inn hotel chain uses an ongoing mail survey to monitor guest satisfaction with the service at each of its locations. After the results are tabulated, each property receives a monthly report of the results showing its scores for the given month, a month-to-month and year-to-date comparison, and how it ranks against all other Hampton Inn properties. Due to budget considerations, the survey was shortened and incentives to participate were removed.