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Marketing Research Articles Related to E-mail Surveys

Marketing Research Articles Related to E-mail Surveys

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E-mail surveys: what we've learned thus far

Published
July 1999
Authors
Barbara A. Schuldt and Jeffrey Totten
Abstract
The growth of the Internet and computer networks has resulted in a steady stream of research into the use of e-mail as a data collection tool. This article discusses what researchers have learned about e-mail surveys as a research tool, including advantages and drawbacks.

How Sony BMG used the Web to reach a disappearing audience

Published
February 2010
Author
Emily Goon, Quirk's Content Editor
Abstract
After losing a chunk of its audience to Web-based music consumption, Sony BMG teamed up with Globalpark to create an online panel of music fans to gain faster, deeper insight using “surveytainment.”

Qualitatively Speaking: Mining LinkedIn for B2B interview leads

Published
March 2010
Authors
Sean Campbell and Scott Swigart
Abstract
Using the tips detailed here, researchers can harness a few of LinkedIn’s lesser-known capabilities to mine for quality prospects for in-depth B2B interviews.

Software makers choose Web, e-mail to measure customer loyalty, satisfaction

Published
April 1999
Author
John Chisholm
Abstract
Four companies in the customer relationship management software industry used e-mail and the Internet to assess customer satisfaction and loyalty compared with that of their closest competitors.

The impact of gender in e-mailed survey invitations

Published
July 2009
Author
Philip Derham
Abstract
In response to a similar exercise in Germany, the author fielded a test in Australia to see if prospective respondents would respond differently to an e-mailed survey invitation sent by a man versus one from a woman. While gender appears not to be a factor, some interesting findings arose from including location-specific information in the subject line.