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Marketing Research Articles Related to Researching Executives and Management

Marketing Research Articles Related to Researching Executives and Management

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A report on the 2010 Globalpark Market Research Software Survey

Published
May 2011
Authors
Tim Macer and Sheila Wilson
Abstract
This iteration of the annual survey of research software users added questions on social media usage and deployment of sample routers and found that CATI seems to be holding its own.

Accountemps relies on surveys to keep tabs on personnel

Published
February 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
For Accountemps, a temporary-help service, research was needed to improve the productivity of its workers. Vice presidents and personnel management were surveyed to find helpful hints on how to improve productivity.

Branding gets personal: Why business leaders should consider their brand identity

Published
August 2012
Author
Suzanne Bates
Abstract
A researcher's branding experience can extend beyond companies and their products to their own leadership. Leaders who discover and build their own personal brands through storytelling and outreach stand to benefit the organization overall.

CEO confidence plummets to record-breaking lows

Published
January 2009
Author
Quirk's Staff

Depth interviews with executives

Published
March 2007
Author
Srijana Dhakhwa
Abstract
The author provides tips on interviewing busy executives, including ways to enhance rapport and how to phrase questions to elicit the most useful responses.

From the Publisher January 1994

Published
January 1994
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Tom Quirk profiles two principals from Brand Institute Inc. to better understand the background of people who operate and manage research companies.

How technology can improve the access and consumption of research presentations

Published
April 2012
Author
Chris Forbes
Abstract
Using the music industry as an example, the author suggests how researchers can use technology to keep findings from becoming irrelevant.

How to spot and nurture your innovative employees

Published
August 2009
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
This article includes tips from authors Cyndi Laurin and Craig Morningstar's book The Rudolph Factor: Finding the Bright Lights that Drive Innovation in Your Business on the qualities most innovators possess and how to bring the best out in them.

IT firm seeks company-wide acceptance of findings from international qualitative project

Published
December 2005
Authors
Shaan Rotolo and Kerry Cole
Abstract
A large IT firm conducted qualitative research with small and medium businesses around the world to understand how the needs of those businesses differed from those of the larger companies with which the firm was more closely identified.

Qualitatively Speaking: Meeting executives face-to-face

Published
March 2006
Author
Margaret R. Roller
Abstract
The author offers six guidelines to conducting effective face-to-face interviews with executives, including setting clearly-defined goals, distinguishing between useful and not useful input, and being a good listener.

Qualitatively Speaking: Nonprobability sampling assures representation and validity with B2B universes

Published
March 2008
Author
Charles H. Ptacek
Abstract
In the B2B research setting, conducting interviews with a few well-chosen experts can provide useful information, even if the sample from which the respondents are chosen isn't statistically valid.

Successful in-depth research among senior financial executives

Published
April 2003
Author
John A. Laurino
Abstract
Conducting effective market research among senior financial executives is notoriously difficult. This article discusses a methodology for obtaining rich, actionable and timely data from senior financial executives.

Trade Talk: Accomplishments and concerns

Published
January 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
The author details marketing executives' predictions regarding the future of survey research and also concerns, which range from too much government control to poor questionnaire design.

Trade Talk: Decision-makers mostly males, study shows

Published
June 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
According to a study from Trinet Inc., women still occupy a low percentage of decision-making positions compared to men in the surveyed companies.

Trade Talk: Do you trust your research suppliers?

Published
November 1993
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
The Marketing Science Institute conducted a study among market research users in major companies across the country to better understand the importance of trust between researchers and suppliers.

Trade Talk: Tuning out the voice of the customer?

Published
March 2009
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Executives responding to a Chief Marketing Officer Council survey generally gave their organizations low marks when it comes to listening to their clients. Rather than using an established feedback and monitoring system, many only hear the customer's voice when conflicts or problems arise.

Using marketing research - views from a CFO

Published
May 2003
Author
Deborah S. Colby
Abstract
In this article, the author, the CFO of a company, offers guidelines to help research buyers get the most out of their market research budget.

What will it take to win in the B2B sphere in 2020?

Published
April 2014
Abstract
Walker’s Leslie Pagel outlines strategies for how B2B firms can align their current and future customer experience practices with the needs of their markets.

Why managers should care about employee loyalty

Published
February 2010
Authors
Lerzan Aksoy, Timothy L. Keiningham and Luke Williams
Abstract
In tough times, staff downsizing is almost inevitable. But rather than focusing on the cost savings that result from letting workers go, companies must conduct research with the remaining employees to measure their opinions and attitudes.