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Marketing Research Articles Related to Eye Tracking

Marketing Research Articles Related to Eye Tracking

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A case study using the Heineken “Weasel” commercial

Published
March 2011
Authors
Sandeep Patnaik and Scott Purvis
Abstract
A number of different approaches have emerged for measuring emotional response to advertisements. This article compares and contrasts the results of three different measurement techniques as they were applied to the same 30-second TV spot for Heineken beer.

A look at eye tracking and click testing

Published
April 2008
Author
Jon Puleston
Abstract
This comparison of eye tracking and click testing details the strengths and weaknesses of each approach and indicates some instances where each is best employed.

A look at the relationship of neuroimaging and marketing research

Published
May 2012
Authors
Sean Green and Neil Holbert
Abstract
Neuroimaging certainly holds promise as a research tool but questions still abound. In this excerpt from their chapter in Leading Edge Marketing Research, the authors examine the concerns, limitations and caveats related to exploring the inner workings of the consumer’s brain.

By the Numbers: Behavioral science and the future of business

Published
June 2012
Author
Aaron Reid
Abstract
The author argues that behavioral science and its associated disciplines offer much promise in researchers’ efforts to go below the surface and uncover true insights.

Comparing eye-tracking to 2 cheaper challengers

Published
March 2014
Author
Jonathan Asher
Abstract
This article focuses on a self-funded study that Perception Research Services conducted to compare eye-tracking research to a mouse-clicking exercise conducted via computer-based interviews and a software algorithm intended to predict visual attention.

Eye tracking helps Saab fine-tune print ads

Published
March 1997
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
When it came time to tweak a long-running print ad series, Saab used an eye-tracking approach that is designed to allow changes to be made to a campaign during the research process rather than afterward.

Eye tracking, product placement and Lady Gaga: What Bad Romance can teach us about embedded branding

Published
January 2011
Authors
Stefanie Gehrke and Jennifer Knodler
Abstract
Some preliminary conclusions about parameters that lead to product recall can be drawn from an exploratory pilot study using eye-tracking technology to capture attention data over the popular music video Bad Romance by Lady Gaga.

Eye-tracking helps reconcile the disconnect between shoppers’ words and their actions

Published
July 2013
Author
Scott Young
Abstract
Scott Young uses retail case studies to share tactical insights for enhancing in-store-marketing and discusses recommended applications of in-store eye-tracking.

Facial coding and eye tracking help uncover consumers’ true responses

Published
October 2006
Author
Dan Hill
Abstract
As interest grows in digging beneath respondents’ stated answers to questions to determine their hidden motivations, companies are turning to facial coding as a way to measure and analyze response to research stimuli.

FAQ: neuromarketing research

Published
May 2011
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
In the first of a new series of quick-reference guides to current research topics, Quirk’s Editor Joe Rydholm takes a look at neuromarketing research - who’s using it, how and why.

Get creative: Seven solutions to improve usability studies

Published
April 2013
Author
Pamela Walshe
Abstract
This article outlines how seven research methodologies not traditionally employed in user experience research can improve usability studies.

Getting the most from eye-tracking

Published
March 2013
Author
Scott Young
Abstract
Scott Young offers best practices for the use of eye-tracking and explores the various research applications of the methodology.

In Case You Missed It... January 2013

Published
January 2013
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
News and notes on marketing and research: Eye tracking used for the impaired; a universal rating system for apps

Insights and implications for packaging research

Published
January 2010
Author
Scott Young
Abstract
Drawing from real-world successes and failures, this article argues that on the shelf and in the home are two proving grounds for innovative packaging designs and explores how research can help enhance the odds of victory.

Linking visual attention to purchase behavior and recall

Published
December 2013
Authors
Brian A. Espin and Colin M. Valdiserri
Abstract
The authors investigated the impact of visual attention on purchase decisions, as well as the relationship between visual attention and stated recall.

Packaging research guides positioning of 3M's innovative line of wood care products

Published
October 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
3M tested a number of packaging designs for its line of wood care products to make sure that the packaging would communicate key ideas and the benefits to both novice and experienced woodworkers. The computer-generated designs experimented with different names for the products (such as Safe Strip, Strip Safer) and informational taglines below the product name to explain the product benefits. The main research methods used were eye-tracking and one-on-one interviews.

Principles for interpreting eye-tracking data

Published
January 2009
Author
Mike Bartels
Abstract
Lost in the excitement of running that first eye-tracking study can be a very basic question: What does it all mean? The author presents three keys to unlocking the technology’s potential: be wary of oversimplification; quantify the behavior of your participants; and incorporate qualitative feedback into your analysis.

Product and Service Update July 2014

Published
July 2014
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
An overview of new tools and offerings for marketing and marketing research

Stiefel Laboratories hopes updated packaging will attract new users without alienating current consumers

Published
October 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Using customer surveys, Stiefel Laboratories discovered that some of its soap users purchased the product on impulse rather than on a doctor’s recommendation. With the goal of increasing these impulse buys, the tested two new potential packaging designs. Using a simulated store shelf planogram, researchers determined how quickly the Oilatum box was seen and how long respondents looked at it. Consumers then viewed the designs separately to determine the points on the packaging they noticed first, second, etc. The researchers used eye tracking and verbal interviews to collect data.

Trade Talk: A handful of tech-driven market research nuggets

Published
June 2011
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Quirk's Editor Joseph Rydholm recaps his time at the IIR's Technology Driven Market Research Event.