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Marketing Research Articles Related to Focus Group Moderating

Marketing Research Articles Related to Focus Group Moderating

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From the Publisher November 1987

Published
November 1987
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Consistent communication and attractive incentives are key when when recruiting "expert" focus group respondents or those with a prominent business position or academic background.

Minimizing client problems on focus group projects

Published
December 1987
Author
Naomi R. Henderson
Abstract
Moderator Naomi Henderson, founder and president of research firm RIVA, outlines ways to minimize focus group problems. Following certain steps can make focus groups more effective.

Conducting qualitative research with children

Published
March 1988
Authors
Dana Blackwell and Brett Blackwell
Abstract
Children are able to give honest and open answers for market research, but child research can be a serious and sometimes difficult task. The author provides some aspects to think about when conducting child research.

From the Publisher May 1988: Focus groups for business-to-business research

Published
May 1988
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Tom Quirk recounts his experience conducting B2B focus groups for new product research and attributes the project's success to careful recruiting and modertating.

The solid gold focus group

Published
December 1988
Author
Harold C. Daume Jr.
Abstract
This article discusses what has led to rising costs of focus groups and 12 practical ways to reduce these costs and increase the utility of focus groups.

The rules change when conducting focus groups for business to business research

Published
December 1989
Author
Nick Calo
Abstract
Given the idea that “people are people,” one might assume that the strategies used for consumer focus groups would apply to business-to-business focus groups, but this is not the case. This article offers strategies and considerations for conducting business-to-business focus groups, including playing dumb, allowing the client in the group room, anonymity, confidentiality and a quantitative follow-up.

Qualities of a Master Moderator

Published
December 1989
Author
Naomi R. Henderson
Abstract
A key element in focus group success is the moderator. This article focuses on qualities of “Master Moderators”—those who have mastered the key skills and techniques that lead to effective group interactions.

How to get better tape recordings of focus groups and interviews

Published
December 1989
Author
Stephanie Tudor
Abstract
This article details 15 ways to get better taping recordings of focus groups and interviews.

From the Publisher March 1990: New book could help you avoid first-time focus group problems

Published
March 1990
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Tom Quirk recommends Thomas L. Greenbaum's book, "The Practical Handbook and Guide To Focus Group Research," as a hands-on, easy-to-read primer for those who are planning their first focus group programs.

Focus groups aid positioning of new boiler control technology

Published
April 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To determine how to market a new boiler system technology and identify the target audience, Cleaver-Brooks conducted focus groups with prospective buyers from a variety of industries and applications, such as hospitals, manufacturing plants, schools and universities. Via an earpiece, the moderator received coaching from company observers throughout the focus group process to ask follow-up probing question or to rephrase questions. Field tests with sample customers were also completed.

Uses and misuses of business-to-business focus groups

Published
April 1990
Author
Alan Zimmerman
Abstract
This article summarizes several common mistakes commonly made in the design of business-to-business focus groups and provides guidance on when to use focus groups as well as best practices strategies when choosing this qualitative research method. The article offers a number of examples of how specific businesses have successfully used focus groups.

Client ground rules for observing focus groups

Published
December 1990
Author
Naomi R. Henderson
Abstract
This article delineates helpful ground rules for participants and observers of focus groups. The author offers detailed guidance for observers, covering topics such as what to do before the focus group begins, allowing for flexibility in the moderator’s treatment of the questions, understanding the likelihood of participants straying from ground rules, strategies for listening and observing, and managing relationships with the location and the moderator.

Principles of rapport - focus group moderation

Published
March 1991
Author
David Farlow
Abstract
This article describes effective communication techniques for developing rapport so that a focus group facilitator can obtain needed information The author focuses on neurolinguistic programming and analytical persuasion methods as well as commonsense techniques for putting people at ease.

Natural group interviewing revisited

Published
May 1991
Author
Michael E. Curtis
Abstract
This article updates a previous article published in Quirk's Marketing Research Review in the December, 1988 issue: "Natural Group Interviewing" by David Pagnucco and Robert Quinn. Natural group interviewing takes into account the explicit interactions that occur in groups of two or more individuals who may play a role in a purchasing decision making process. The Automotive Research Group of Maritz Marketing research included the natural group interviewing (NGI) concept as part of three major product clinics. This article addresses approaches to gathering quantitative and qualitative data when using NGI and issues related to respondent show rates and recruiting when using NGI.

How to keep respondents from taking over focus groups

Published
December 1991
Author
Judith Langer
Abstract
This article describes 18 body language and verbal techniques to help moderators handle difficult dynamics in focus groups without stifling the research process.

Backroom moderators...or How two perspectives are better than one

Published
December 1991
Author
Tim Huberty
Abstract
While focus groups and one-on-one interviews often use a two-way mirror so that clients can observe the dynamics unseen and discuss what is happening during the event, researchers usually only record what is happening on the user and moderator side of the mirror. The insights behind the mirror are lost. This article suggests that researchers use two moderators, one for each side of the mirror, to capture information from the back room as well as the front room.

Tips on controlling focus group crosstalk

Published
December 1991
Author
Stephanie Tudor
Abstract
This article provides recommendations for controlling crosstalk in focus groups. Crosstalk happens when more than one respondent speaks at a time, or when respondents interrupt each other, or when there is a constant background of secondary conversation going on while the main respondent is speaking.

Beyond conventional focus groups: emerging options for qualitative research

Published
December 1991
Author
Hy Mariampolski
Abstract
This article describes variations on conventional focus groups and discusses how to avoid pitfalls in implementing them. Different approaches include expanding the time frame, using different types of venues (e.g., homes, on-site, restaurants), reducing the number of participants, incorporating structured confrontation rather than emphasizing consensus and creating an iterative process that builds on prior focus group experiences.

Focus on advertising: When, why & how to use qualitative research

Published
December 1991
Author
Daniel Oromaner
Abstract
This article discusses when to use qualitative advertising research, what to consider in planning such research, and what new qualitative techniques are available for exploring advertising. Particular methodology issues include the use of one-one-one interviews vs. focus groups, the number of ads tested and the types of user reactions to measure.

The art of moderating: A blend of basic skills & qualities

Published
December 1991
Author
Naomi R. Henderson
Abstract
Effective moderators use a variety of skills and techniques to garner opinions. beliefs, and attitudes from the group in a two-hour period. This article describes 16 basic moderator skills and provides clients with 20 questions to ask if the data is not on par with expectations to determine if the problem is moderator-driven or due to some other factor.