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Marketing Research Articles Related to the Hospitality Industry

Marketing Research Articles Related to the Hospitality Industry

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Companies seeking insights on satisfaction shouldn’t overlook online and other text sources

Published
October 2006
Author
Tom Anderson
Abstract
Verbatim responses and other textual sources provide valuable and often untapped sources of insights on customer satisfaction. The author cites a case history involving hotel company Starwood and its use of text mining to glean helpful data.

Data Use: A good choice for choice modeling

Published
January 2010
Author
Michael Lieberman
Abstract
Maximum difference scaling lets researchers present respondents with large numbers of choice options without making the process onerous. The article uses examples of a hotel loyalty program and restaurant menu optimization to show the technique in action.

Feedback portals can engender customer goodwill, satisfaction

Published
January 2009
Author
Vivek Bhaskaran
Abstract
If you make your most-engaged customers feel as though they are part of the very fabric of your business they will quickly become one of your most important strategic assets. Building and establishing an online feedback portal, which is explained here, can help create an ongoing dialog with these customers.

For hotels cutting back on services to trim costs, how far is too far?

Published
May 2009
Author
Lincoln Merrihew
Abstract
Results from a survey of prospective travelers show that some hotel amenities are more valued than others. As travel-industry firms look to cut costs, research can provide needed direction on where services can be reduced, re-priced or eliminated, as across-the-board changes run the risk of alienating large customer segments, possibly permanently.

Hilton uses research in creation of vacation promotion

Published
June 1989
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Hilton Hotels Corp. conducted a telephone survey of 1000 adults regarding their weekend leisure and work habits in the development of its BounceBack Weekend vacation program.

How CiCi’s Pizza used mystery shopping to set company-wide standards/evaluation metrics

Published
March 2010
Authors
John F. "Skip" Cindric, Mae Nutley and Steve Hawter
Abstract
CiCi’s Pizza commissioned a mystery shopping study to identify ways employees could help guests feel welcome and establish corporate standards by which performance could be measured - including know-your-name service and satisfying special requests.

How Marriott International tapped mobile research to get feedback on enhancements to its mobile site

Published
June 2010
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Shared expectations and awareness of the technique’s strengths and weaknesses helped Marriott get the most out of a mobile survey of users of its Marriott Mobile site. The results augmented data gathered from a host of other sources to give a fuller look at the user experience.

How the travel industry is coping with today’s recession

Published
May 2009
Author
Jim Quilty
Abstract
Drawing from research with business and leisure travelers and conversations with travel industry firms, the author explains the impact of the economic downturn and explores the role of travel companies’ marketing research in these difficult times.

How to evoke respondents’ brand-related stories

Published
December 2009
Author
Tom Neveril
Abstract
The author explores the use of storytelling - including elements such as plot, conflict, surprise and lesson - to uncover and explore a consumer’s relationship to a brand.

In Case You Missed It... January 2014

Published
January 2014
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
News and notes on marketing and research: handling bad press; Hyatt's Twitter focus group

In Case You Missed It... June 2010

Published
June 2010
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
News and notes on marketing and research: anti-drinking advertising can backfire; Florida law enforcement using focus groups to solve cold cases; writing hotel reviews

Integrating marketing tools facilitates location of new construction

Published
March 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
FountainPlace is a mixed-use development that will occupy one million square feet of retail, hotel and office space. Integrating all of these different aspects into a single development required vast market research by JMB/Federated Market Research Co. Complicated statistical models were used to analyze emerging and changing demographics within market areas to pinpoint future opportunities.

Mail survey, in-house database helps La Quinta Inns monitor guest satisfaction

Published
October 1999
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
La Quinta Inns uses a mail survey of recent guests and a desktop system accessible by managers to measure and drive customer satisfaction.

Ongoing customer satisfaction research helps Hampton Inns guarantee good service

Published
November 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
The Hampton Inn hotel chain uses an ongoing mail survey to monitor guest satisfaction with the service at each of its locations. After the results are tabulated, each property receives a monthly report of the results showing its scores for the given month, a month-to-month and year-to-date comparison, and how it ranks against all other Hampton Inn properties. Due to budget considerations, the survey was shortened and incentives to participate were removed.

Projective techniques help nightclub concoct nostalgia-filled cocktails for Gen X patrons

Published
December 1999
Author
Dean Bates
Abstract
Wilhelmina’s, a Philadelphia nightclub, used projective techniques that involve sight, sound, smell and touch to make design decisions that would appeal to younger patrons.

Proper use of a mystery shopper report

Published
January 2000
Author
Michael Bare
Abstract
Usually a service firm will at some time need to hire a mystery shopper or guest services evaluator. This article describes how evaluators do their work and what should be included in their reports. The author stresses that a mystery shopping report not be used as the sole indicator of personnel problems, but as a steppingstone for further research to develop management and staff and to prevent or correct problems.

Research guides Holiday Corp.'s creation of a lodging chain for business travelers

Published
February 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Holiday Corporation purchased consumer panel mail survey results to track trends in consumer travel habits. It also performed several follow-up research projects, including focus groups and follow-up telephone and mail surveys with panelists, to find out what features Homewood Suites would have to meet the specific needs of the target market and to test two potential concepts for its facilities.

Respondents in interactive groups approve Best Western's ambitious ad campaign

Published
June 1996
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Best Western used interactive large-group interviews to determine the success of its new television ad campaign aimed at informing consumers that the hotel chain had upgraded its appearance and quality.

Satisfying no longer: Part I: Satisfaction research needs to return to focusing on the customer

Published
July 2009
Authors
Chris Goodwin and Dennis Q. Murphy
Abstract
In part one of a three-part series, the authors outline how satisfaction measurement has gone wrong. What started as a well-intentioned, customer-focused endeavor has in many instances become an exercise that is more concerned with, and subject to corruption by, corporate needs.

Study examines the link between hotel employee performance and guest satisfaction

Published
October 2007
Authors
Frank Mulhern and Robert Passikoff
Abstract
This article describes an approach to establishing financial values for each aspect of the hotel guest experience. It addresses two critical planning questions: Can employee engagement and behavior be linked to guest expectations that allow for the calculation of potential “future value” created by better managing the guest experience? And, in an age when guest “delight” turns into “expectation,” how can hotels avoid commoditization and maintain guest loyalty?