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Marketing Research Articles Related to the Leisure Industry

Marketing Research Articles Related to the Leisure Industry

Showing items 1-20 of 47.

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Marketing research strikes American Bowling Congress

Published
December 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Researchers conducted focus groups and mail questionnaires to understand the needs of the American Bowling Congress’ current members in order to gain insight and direction for both retaining members and attracting new ones.

Symphony tunes into research

Published
May 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
The Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra completed a series of focus groups and a telephone survey to determine how it might increase its ticket sales. The key issues addressed in the focus groups were quantified in the telephone interviews.

Research guides Holiday Corp.'s creation of a lodging chain for business travelers

Published
February 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Holiday Corporation purchased consumer panel mail survey results to track trends in consumer travel habits. It also performed several follow-up research projects, including focus groups and follow-up telephone and mail surveys with panelists, to find out what features Homewood Suites would have to meet the specific needs of the target market and to test two potential concepts for its facilities.

Focus groups tell California-based mountain bike maker its ad campaign is a winner

Published
March 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To develop a new advertising strategy to apply to market its mountain bikes. Specialized Bicycle Components Inc. conducted one-on-one interviews with employees about what they thought about mountain bike advertising in the industry magazines It then used focus groups with current and prospective riders to determine their psychological makeup and test its new marketing brochure.

Research and a strong marketing campaign keep Copper Mountain's business hot

Published
March 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Copper Mountain conducted one-on-one interviews with skiers on a chairlift ride to solicit impressions of service areas, to find out about skiing preferences, and to determine awareness of advertising. To delve deeper into perceptions of Copper Mountain and other ski areas and test a potential marketing campaign, it also held focus groups with a number of skiers who had taken the lift survey.

Research with travelers helps Samsonite develop a convenient new line of luggage

Published
February 1992
Author
Bob Bengen
Abstract
Samsonite Corporation applied a range of quantitative and qualitative research strategies as it developed its Piggyback line of luggage. The company used exploratory focus groups to help determine the travel needs, one-on-one interviews to test initial and drawings depicting conceptual designs, field tests of sample products and surveys of potential users.

Research uncovers keys to creating good advertising for soccer’s World Cup

Published
March 1994
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Dentsu Corporation of America used Brand Keys, a projective research technique, in the development of ads promoting the 1994 World Cup in America. This challenging campaign had to satisfy 11 company clients and their respective ad agencies.

Florida golf school uses neural networks to analyze advertising brochure

Published
March 1995
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
The Ben Sutton Golf School used neural networks to critique new advertising copy. The analysis generated quantitative information in three phases used to evaluate existing and new advertising. The artificial neural network analysis can be a valuable safety-check of copy and design efforts.

Teens respond well to online research on games

Published
December 1996
Author
Carla Sarett
Abstract
The Internet poses exciting new research possibilities. Chilton Research Services used an online panel of 11-to-18-year-olds to collect data on the general area of technology and media as well as computer games and on-line gaming.

Research with tourists and travel agents measures viability of high-speed train in Orlando

Published
February 1996
Author
William Bailey
Abstract
Maglev Transit Inc. used a two-part study that integrated qualitative and quantitative techniques with consumers and travel agents to measure viability of a high-speed train proposed for Orlando, Fla.

Respondents in interactive groups approve Best Western's ambitious ad campaign

Published
June 1996
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Best Western used interactive large-group interviews to determine the success of its new television ad campaign aimed at informing consumers that the hotel chain had upgraded its appearance and quality.

Mystery shopping makes sure salespeople sing praises of Yamaha digital pianos

Published
January 1997
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Yamaha used mystery shopping to stimulate interest in and sales of the company's digital pianos.

Agency uses a little R&R (research & relaxation) to develop ads for RV group

Published
March 1997
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
The Go RVing Coalition used qualitative research to investigate Baby Boomers who own RVs compared with those who do not in the process of developing television and print advertising.

Maxfli puts a new spin on its golf ball line

Published
May 1997
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Maxfli used a variety of qualitative and quantitative approaches to guide logo, packaging and advertising redesign in an effort to create a niche in the multimillion-dollar golf industry.

In satisfaction terms, this ship was the Titanic

Published
November 1998
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Most organizations claim to be interested in customer satisfaction and customer loyalty, using evaluations to impress customers with their commitment. By way of personal experience on a cruise, this article addresses Norwegian Cruise Line's poor service, its clear mismeasurement of customer satisfaction and how the company might go about having some satisfaction to measure.

Projective techniques help nightclub concoct nostalgia-filled cocktails for Gen X patrons

Published
December 1999
Author
Dean Bates
Abstract
Wilhelmina’s, a Philadelphia nightclub, used projective techniques that involve sight, sound, smell and touch to make design decisions that would appeal to younger patrons.

Minor league, major loyalty - Michigan baseball team surveys its fans

Published
October 2000
Author
Tom Logue
Abstract
Minor league baseball team West Michigan Whitecaps used a questionnaire to help determine how to effectively maintain fan loyalty on a limited budget.

Research uncovers new markets, new directions for Coleman

Published
December 2001
Author
Cara Woodland
Abstract
Coleman used a variety of qualitative research techniques to find new areas of business and revenue.

Study helps develop ticket options for Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex

Published
May 2001
Author
William Bailey
Abstract
Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center used one-on-one interviews with 506 visitors to examine ticket pricing.

Online surveys help Paramount Parks keep respondents and visitors happy

Published
July 2004
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
The director of research for theme-park company Paramount Parks details his use of online and other surveys to measure guest satisfaction.