Skip to: Main Content / Navigation

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Add This

Marketing Research Articles Related to Low Incidence Research

Marketing Research Articles Related to Low Incidence Research

Showing items 1-18 of 18.

Sort

Refine Search

Date

Login required for most articles published within the last three years

By the Numbers: Sample quality: selecting one from many

Published
January 2009
Author
Stephen J. Hellebusch
Abstract
Using a real-life example of a line extension, the author shows the impact that sample quality can have on testing the viability of a new product concept. In this case, factors related to low incidence made the research results tell an incomplete story.

By the Numbers: The need for quality assurance in profession-based targeted panels

Published
November 2010
Author
Chris Szczepanski
Abstract
The author offers a series of validation metrics that buyers of profession-based panels can discuss with their suppliers to better gauge sample quality.

By the Numbers: The pros and cons of sampling modes

Published
December 2008
Author
Linda Piekarski
Abstract
Sampling methodologies come in all shapes and sizes. This article looks at various approaches are explores the value of combining them to get the most useful results.

Evolving professionals, evolving panels: B2B research propels a new era of business insights

Published
April 2013
Authors
Tonya Parsons and Adam Sowers
Abstract
B2B research is becoming more demanding and researchers must consider the changing professional landscape and tailor their solutions to gather rich insights. The authors use B2B panels as an example of a traditional technique that can be modified to suit evolving B2B needs.

Five simple tips to stretch your research dollars

Published
August 2010
Authors
Amy Rey and Ken Zeldis
Abstract
Although the research industry appears to be recovering from the Great Recession, maintaining money-saving habits is still at the forefront of researchers' minds. The authors offer five ways to conduct effective qual and quant with thrift.

How Dell used telepresence to foster global conversation without traveling the globe

Published
May 2011
Author
Emily Goon, Quirk's Content Editor
Abstract
A Dell researcher weighs in on the benefits and drawbacks of conducting global research using telepresence technology among a hard-to-reach audience.

Interviewing the GLBT market

Published
February 2004
Author
Deborah Gonderil
Abstract
Research with gay consumers offers a host of hurdles. The author presents guidelines for the various approaches - qualitative and quantitative - and presents findings from some of her firm’s research with GLBT consumers.

Lessons to keep in mind when interviewing via Webcam

Published
January 2012
Author
Michael Carlon
Abstract
An early user of online qualitative tools offers his tips on conducting Webcam-based studies.

Overcoming the obstacles to effective B2B panel research

Published
April 2014
Author
Pete Cape
Abstract
Pete Cape offers thoughts on the differences between consumer and B2B research and looks at some of the issues involved in researching B2B respondents online.

Practical sampling methods for low-incidence populations

Published
May 1999
Authors
Kevin J. O'Donnell and Peter Brownstein
Abstract
Until recently, most marketing research adhered to the law of randomness for sampling low-incidence populations, which required an abundance of time and money. This article discusses practical sampling methods for low-incidence populations.

Qualitatively Speaking: The prescription for effective physician interviews

Published
January 2004
Author
Sheryl Bronkesh
Abstract
Physicians are difficult to reach and in high demand as research participants. But by using well-trained interviewers and making the research process interactive, the author argues that companies can conduct successful studies that satisfy both the respondent and the organization sponsoring the research.

Research encourages a comprehensive redesign of Blue Nun packaging

Published
October 1989
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
After conducting taste tests that confirmed that packaging was a factor in declining sales, Blue Nun wine held extensive focus groups with current and past consumers and competitive brand purchasers, as well as shelf tests, in its package re-design process.

Seven tips for a successful recruit for difficult medical market research projects

Published
March 2014
Authors
Chris Lee and Michael Schulte
Abstract
Medical market research can require a deeper understanding of the respondent than many other types of research. Here are strategies for gaining that understanding.

Social media-based tools helped find, retain respondents for unique study

Published
August 2012
Author
Kelley Styring
Abstract
Seeking product design insights for our multitasking-crazed world, researcher Kelley Styring sought input from an unlikely source: arm amputees.

Take these steps to build your research on a solid foundation

Published
November 2010
Author
Mark Hardy
Abstract
Beyond getting the right sample, researchers conducting online surveys face a host of obstacles, from harder-to-reach consumers to the speeders and cheaters who lurk among the pool of willing respondents. Here are 10 topics to cover with your sample provider to help improve your odds.

Tips for dealing with tight budgets and tough qual recruits

Published
January 2014
Author
Amy E. Boren
Abstract
As budgets shrink and focus group recruiting demands grow, researchers may want to consider employing virtual backup teams to deliver fresh respondents by any creative means necessary.

Use care, preparation when conducting medical qualitative research

Published
June 2009
Author
Mary S. Hurley
Abstract
Because medical market research respondents are not self-selecting, qualitative researchers are advised to take time to learn about their needs and limitations - emotionally and physically - and do what they can to meet respondents as they are.

When recruiting physicians for online research, don’t overlook the fax machine

Published
January 2004
Author
Lynn Welsh
Abstract
Using the fax machine to recruit physicians works surprisingly well, the author says. She argues that the faxed invitation, when done right, can eliminate the bias that Web-based recruiting introduces.