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Marketing Research Articles Related to Mail Surveys

Marketing Research Articles Related to Mail Surveys

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Questionnaire helps Owens-Corning Fiberglas examine remodelers market

Published
February 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Owens-Corning, a manufacturer of glass fiber materials, initiated a study to find out how the company was fulfilling the needs of remodelers. A questionnaire was sent out to 450 contractors, had high return and increased awareness in the company of an important segment of the marketplace.

Marketers track, understand teens with syndicated studies

Published
August 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Marketing to teenagers can be difficult, but Teenage Research Unlimited uses self-administered questionnaires with follow-up mailings to monitor the teen market. It may be a volatile market, but companies like MTV and Seventeen Magazine have found that up-to-date information on teens can be very helpful.

Research propels Midwest Living to a fast start

Published
June 1987
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Marketing research reveals important demographic information for Midwestern publisher.

Changes in health care prompt clinic to use market research

Published
June 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
In an increasingly competitive health care industry, clinics like Park Nicollet in Minnesota are finding that market research can be invaluable. Mail surveys and one-on-one interviews are some of the techniques the clinic has used to gauge the marketplace.

Computer interviewing gaining popularity

Published
March 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Many people fear the idea of a face-to-face interview. Computer interviews can decrease intimidation, elicit more truthful responses and save time for interviewers.

Dairy calcium ads change attitudes

Published
April 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Representatives of the dairy industry knew that the calcium in milk helps build strong bones and ward off osteoporosis, they just needed to let medical professionals know the benefits of the popular drink. So the dairy industry released a series of ads targeting medical professionals. Market research, including pre-testing by telephone and post-testing by mail, proved these ads effective in spreading the good word about milk.

Health care research valuable, underutilized

Published
April 1988
Author
Hale T. Chan
Abstract
"Probably one of the most neglected parts of marketing in today's health care industry," according industry expert Hale T. Chan, "is the area of market research." As the corporate director of marketing at St. Mary of Nazareth Hospital, Chicago, Chan has used mail questionnaires and patient satisfaction surveys to develop more effective planning and promotional strategies.

A method for finding 'virgin' respondents

Published
December 1988
Author
Virginia Smith
Abstract
The researchers used a sample of their mailed survey respondents to a “Get Paid for Your Opinions” direct mail effort to explore the makeup of study recruits. Participants responded to a questionnaire through phone or mailed responses. This study is one of the first to combine information about lifetime experience in focus groups with reasons for wanting to participate in them, as well as demographic data.

Marketing research strikes American Bowling Congress

Published
December 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Researchers conducted focus groups and mail questionnaires to understand the needs of the American Bowling Congress’ current members in order to gain insight and direction for both retaining members and attracting new ones.

Survey defines lawn mower purchasing habits

Published
December 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
This study used a mailed survey to mower purchasers to identify their characteristics and determine factors influencing their purchasing decisions. The researchers grouped the respondents into categories based upon the primary motivators of their decision-making process: brand name, features, price and outlet.

Surveyed mechanics say modern car quality down

Published
February 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
It might seem that automobile technology and quality are improving, but according to many mechanics, U.S. car quality is lower today than 10 years ago. The survey, conducted by mailed questionnaires, has identified a lack of support, few improvements and warranty ignorance as some of the problems facing U.S. cars today.

McGraw-Hill shows it's the place to get market information

Published
February 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
McGraw-Hill, publishers of Electrical Construction & Maintenance magazine and Electrical Wholesaling magazine know the value of market research. Using a variety of techniques, including mailed questionnaires and telephone surveys, the company gathers information for the editorial and advertising sections of the McGraw-Hill magazines.

Syndicated study tracks trends in office furniture

Published
August 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Kennedy Research Inc. conducts a quarterly Office Trends study to gain insights and information on the office industry. The firm mails a questionnaire to participants from a panel of key industry experts drawn primarily from top dealers, contractors, general managers, design firms, architects and Fortune 500 companies. The article describes the key questions in the study and highlights how three companies have used the results in their businesses.

Research guides Holiday Corp.'s creation of a lodging chain for business travelers

Published
February 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Holiday Corporation purchased consumer panel mail survey results to track trends in consumer travel habits. It also performed several follow-up research projects, including focus groups and follow-up telephone and mail surveys with panelists, to find out what features Homewood Suites would have to meet the specific needs of the target market and to test two potential concepts for its facilities.

A look at the customer survey process at Caterpillar Inc.

Published
November 1990
Author
Brett Blackwell
Abstract
Caterpillar Inc. conducted focus groups and mailed surveys to determine its customers’ perception of product quality and potential areas for improvement.

Federal Express uses an ongoing study to track customer satisfaction

Published
November 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Federal Express interviewed customers about a wide variety of services and mailed surveys to customers to explore a narrower set of services in more depth. These methods were part of the company’s ongoing customer satisfaction study. The company also internally monitored its performance in a number of service areas as part of its Service Quality Indicator program, tracking issues such as the incidence of packages delivered late or on the wrong day.

CSi program helps GM dealers monitor customer satisfaction

Published
February 1991
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
General Motors sent buyers of new GM cars and trucks a mailed customer satisfaction survey six months after the purchase of their vehicle to measure customer satisfaction with the services of the dealer who sold the car or truck and satisfaction with the vehicle. Survey results were tabulated and reported monthly to each dealer as part of GM's Customer Satisfaction Index (CSi) program.

Consumers give Mannington a winning formula for new vinyl flooring product

Published
May 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Mannington Resilient Floors used several research strategies to develop its successful flooring product. In addition to a telephone survey, Mannington used HTI Custom Research's monthly mail omnibus study to determine some basic purchase dynamics and the demographics of purchasers of floor coverings. Consumers were asked about their level of satisfaction with different kinds of floor coverings and what the coverings’ strong and weak points were. Mannington also studied retailers and others in the trade to gauge perceptions compared to its competitors and to determine how to increase and improve its industry profile.

Ongoing customer satisfaction research helps Hampton Inns guarantee good service

Published
November 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
The Hampton Inn hotel chain uses an ongoing mail survey to monitor guest satisfaction with the service at each of its locations. After the results are tabulated, each property receives a monthly report of the results showing its scores for the given month, a month-to-month and year-to-date comparison, and how it ranks against all other Hampton Inn properties. Due to budget considerations, the survey was shortened and incentives to participate were removed.

Data Use: Controlling non-response bias and item non-response bias using CATI techniques

Published
November 1991
Author
Michael Sullivan
Abstract
This article describes how computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) techniques can help reduce non-response bias and item non-response bias in survey research. The author presents mixed-mode surveying, which combines telephone and mail surveys, as one approach to controlling and measuring non-response bias.