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Marketing Research Articles Related to Mail Surveys

Marketing Research Articles Related to Mail Surveys

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15 tips and techniques for survey research

Published
December 1992
Author
Gayle Kaplan
Abstract
This article offers 15 tips and techniques to think about before beginning survey research to obtain useful and valid information. Some areas discussed include survey design and wording, sampling issues, statistics tools, timing for telephone surveys, strategies for increasing responses to mailed surveys, and issues related to anonymity and confidentiality.

A comparison of Internet and mail survey methodologies

Published
July 2001
Authors
Bobby Medlin and Dwayne Whitten
Abstract
Survey instruments are the primary means of data collection for organization researchers. Advances in technology make the Internet an appealing tool for survey research. This article examines Internet surveys, comparing the research tool to the older tools of fax surveys and mail surveys.

A look at the customer survey process at Caterpillar Inc.

Published
November 1990
Author
Brett Blackwell
Abstract
Caterpillar Inc. conducted focus groups and mailed surveys to determine its customers’ perception of product quality and potential areas for improvement.

A method for finding 'virgin' respondents

Published
December 1988
Author
Virginia Smith
Abstract
The researchers used a sample of their mailed survey respondents to a “Get Paid for Your Opinions” direct mail effort to explore the makeup of study recruits. Participants responded to a questionnaire through phone or mailed responses. This study is one of the first to combine information about lifetime experience in focus groups with reasons for wanting to participate in them, as well as demographic data.

A quick test in methods to increase mail response rates

Published
May 2000
Author
David D. Fish
Abstract
There has been a fair amount of debate about how to increase response rates in consumer mail studies. This article offers a short true/false test about mail response rates. The questions and their answers are meant to serve as guidelines for conducting consumer mail studies.

A report on the 2008 Confirmit Market Research Software Survey

Published
May 2009
Authors
Sheila Wilson and Tim Macer
Abstract
Findings from the annual Confirmit Market Research Software Survey show that firms feel they aren’t getting everything they need from existing software. As a result, they are developing their own programs and actively open to switching to those of other providers.

A report on the 2009 Globalpark Market Research Software Survey

Published
July 2010
Authors
Tim Macer and Sheila Wilson
Abstract
This time around, results show that larger research companies are leading the charge when it comes to adopting mobile research techniques and, in spite of all the industry buzz, online communities have not yet taken off.

A report on the 2010 Globalpark Market Research Software Survey

Published
May 2011
Authors
Tim Macer and Sheila Wilson
Abstract
This iteration of the annual survey of research software users added questions on social media usage and deployment of sample routers and found that CATI seems to be holding its own.

Address-based sampling may provide alternatives for surveys that require contacts with representative samples of households

Published
May 2009
Authors
Mansour Fahimi and Dale Kulp
Abstract
This article examines factors contributing to researchers’ increased interest in address-based sampling (ABS) and looks at the pros and cons of ABS. Against a backdrop of declining response rates, ABS appears to offer a convenient framework for effective design and implementation of surveys that employ multimode alternatives for data collection.

Agri-marketers direct mail with syndicated study

Published
July 1989
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
With direct mail being used more and more in the agriculture industry, farm equipment, seed, and chemical marketers are seeking answers to questions about how farmers are receiving their messages. This article discusses the findings of Mail Monitor, a syndicated study that compiles the reactions of farmers in 12 states to the direct mail they receive, including level of readership and action taken for each piece, its size and carrier type and the quantity of mail farmers receive.

An analysis of the past 20 years of client-side research buying

Published
October 2011
Author
Emily Goon, Quirk's Content Editor
Abstract
Two decades’ worth of data from the Quirk’s circulation database is examined to discover what shifts have taken place in the research industry - including the advent of online and the latest economic crisis - and to predict where it might be headed.

Appreciating the value of traditional research in a digital world

Published
June 2012
Author
Stephen Turner
Abstract
This article details the benefits unique to face-to-face research, including group bonding and access to nonverbal cues and metadata.

By the Numbers: Mail surveys- the right alternative

Published
July 2005
Author
Joel Zeiler
Abstract
Despite their age and drawbacks, mail surveys are still a viable research methodology for certain specific situations.

By the Numbers: Sample quality: selecting one from many

Published
January 2009
Author
Stephen J. Hellebusch
Abstract
Using a real-life example of a line extension, the author shows the impact that sample quality can have on testing the viability of a new product concept. In this case, factors related to low incidence made the research results tell an incomplete story.

Changes in health care prompt clinic to use market research

Published
June 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
In an increasingly competitive health care industry, clinics like Park Nicollet in Minnesota are finding that market research can be invaluable. Mail surveys and one-on-one interviews are some of the techniques the clinic has used to gauge the marketplace.

Charlotte art museum uses research to light path into 21st century

Published
February 1998
Author
Michael Straus
Abstract
Mint Museum of Art used focus groups and mailed questionnaires to measure awareness, usage and attitudes toward the existing museum and a proposed new museum. The information was used to guide marketing of both the old and new museums.

Computer interviewing gaining popularity

Published
March 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Many people fear the idea of a face-to-face interview. Computer interviews can decrease intimidation, elicit more truthful responses and save time for interviewers.

Consumers give Mannington a winning formula for new vinyl flooring product

Published
May 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Mannington Resilient Floors used several research strategies to develop its successful flooring product. In addition to a telephone survey, Mannington used HTI Custom Research's monthly mail omnibus study to determine some basic purchase dynamics and the demographics of purchasers of floor coverings. Consumers were asked about their level of satisfaction with different kinds of floor coverings and what the coverings’ strong and weak points were. Mannington also studied retailers and others in the trade to gauge perceptions compared to its competitors and to determine how to increase and improve its industry profile.

CSi program helps GM dealers monitor customer satisfaction

Published
February 1991
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
General Motors sent buyers of new GM cars and trucks a mailed customer satisfaction survey six months after the purchase of their vehicle to measure customer satisfaction with the services of the dealer who sold the car or truck and satisfaction with the vehicle. Survey results were tabulated and reported monthly to each dealer as part of GM's Customer Satisfaction Index (CSi) program.