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Marketing Research Articles Related to the Medical Industry

Marketing Research Articles Related to the Medical Industry

Showing items 1-20 of 51.

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Dairy calcium ads change attitudes

Published
April 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Representatives of the dairy industry knew that the calcium in milk helps build strong bones and ward off osteoporosis, they just needed to let medical professionals know the benefits of the popular drink. So the dairy industry released a series of ads targeting medical professionals. Market research, including pre-testing by telephone and post-testing by mail, proved these ads effective in spreading the good word about milk.

A Colorado HMO ties patient satisfaction to physician incentives

Published
November 1993
Authors
Charles Gaughan and Lori Muneta
Abstract
TakeCare HMO conducted a telephone satisfaction survey to gauge its primary-care physicians' performance in three crucial areas: access to care, physician care, and the office staff and environment. Rather than using a research firm to conduct these phone surveys, the HMO used specially trained employees.

For GE Medical Systems each customer is a market of one

Published
October 1993
Author
Jamal Din
Abstract
GE Medical Systems Group used two types of mailed surveys to encourage customers to voice their opinions. The first survey, called the post-installation tracking study, asked for the customer's opinion of the sales process, preinstallation, delivery, installation, training and product performance for their recent purchase. The second survey, the sales and service tracking study, asked the customer to evaluate GE Medical's total account management and service delivery performance.

Designing medical products for the global economy

Published
November 2000
Authors
Tammy Humm Donelson and Bryce G. Rutter
Abstract
Medical products are particularly sensitive to cultural influence because the differences in medical practices throughout the world are considerable. This article discusses designing medical products for the global market using cross-cultural research, including avoiding common pitfalls, when to use cross-cultural research, defining procedures, incorporating a study control, and costs.

The role of research in medical device design

Published
June 2003
Authors
Robert Schumacher and Gavin Lew
Abstract
The FDA mandates good manufacturing practices that ensure proper medical device design. This article discusses medical device design research, advocating a user-centered approach to health care products and devices as good business.

Qualitatively Speaking: The prescription for effective physician interviews

Published
January 2004
Author
Sheryl Bronkesh
Abstract
Physicians are difficult to reach and in high demand as research participants. But by using well-trained interviewers and making the research process interactive, the author argues that companies can conduct successful studies that satisfy both the respondent and the organization sponsoring the research.

Using qualitative research to get doctors to open up

Published
June 2007
Author
Steve Richardson
Abstract
QRCA members pass along valuable tips and techniques for getting doctors - a notoriously difficult bunch - to actively participate in the qualitative process.

The key to good qualitative research

Published
June 2007
Author
Murray Simon
Abstract
By adhering to a set of moderator best practices no matter the qualitative methodology, the author argues that complaints about the qualitative process can be effectively neutralized.

A field test of Rogers’ adoption typology among health care providers

Published
June 2007
Author
Michael Latta
Abstract
Does the Rogers adoption typology stand up when applied to physicians and the drugs they prescribe? Research found that a higher percentage of medical personnel fell into the Innovator, Early Adopter and Early Majority categories than would be expected according to Rogers’ theory.

Using role play and guided imagery for concept generation

Published
December 2007
Author
Mark Shekoyan
Abstract
For designers of new products, the author recommends conducting role play exercises in which the participants put themselves in the users’ shoes. By paying attention to physical and emotional reactions to situations encountered during the role play, designers can create products that that really serve users’ needs.

To field successful medical interviews, run them through these tests

Published
June 2008
Author
John Voda
Abstract
Medical marketing research interviews bring with them a host of specialized needs and potential problem areas. For example, interviewing doctors - who place a high value on their time - can be tricky and the use of specialized medical terminology can be hard for interviewers. The authors walks through many steps in the medical interview process and offers tips and advice on how to field quality research.

How to make sure your physician surveys are giving you accurate information

Published
June 2009
Authors
Andrew Aprill and Matt Campion
Abstract
In online research with physicians, three parties - the doctors, the client company and the research vendor - are responsible for ensuring data quality. This article outlines steps to follow to ensure that each stakeholder holds up their end of the bargain.

Use care, preparation when conducting medical qualitative research

Published
June 2009
Author
Mary S. Hurley
Abstract
Because medical market research respondents are not self-selecting, qualitative researchers are advised to take time to learn about their needs and limitations - emotionally and physically - and do what they can to meet respondents as they are.

A look at the buying process model

Published
June 2009
Author
Sharon S. Paik
Abstract
This article explains a method called the buying process approach, which helps pharmaceutical firms closely examine how patients move through the health care system. By identifying areas where problems occur and understanding how those problems affect patients’ use of health care brands, marketers can design strategies to overcome roadblocks.

Faster than a speeding survey: Part I: Rules of the road for online research with physicians

Published
June 2009
Authors
Terri Maciolek and Jeffrey Palish
Abstract
Physicians expect and should receive an enjoyable time when they take a survey out for a spin, but there are several safeguards that researchers and panel vendors must take to ensure that everyone emerges unscathed when the trip is over.

Faster than a speeding survey: Part II: The physician's perspective

Published
July 2009
Authors
Terri Maciolek and Jeffrey Palish
Abstract
In the second part of a two-part series on online surveys with physicians, the authors explore doctors’ reasons for participating in the research process and examine the factors that can lead to speeding and cheating.

Pharma's a battlefield: why companies should spend, not skimp, on market research

Published
November 2009
Author
Andrew D. Cutler
Abstract
The author argues that the long-term risks of forgoing pharmaceutical marketing research far outweigh the short-term cost savings and proposes several questions any successful marketing research program should be able to answer.

Rapport and reports - what matters to health-care research end users?

Published
December 2009
Authors
Michael Feehan, Denise Wong, John Hartman and Linda Lawrie
Abstract
Researchers from Observant LLC and Pfizer explore what the key satisfaction drivers are among health-care and pharmaceutical end users. Results suggest anticipation of needs, excellent rapport and boardroom-ready reports matter most.

The two-room focus group: how to restructure and enrich responses

Published
December 2009
Author
Gavin Johnston
Abstract
The author suggests that challenging the traditional focus group set-up will get respondents thinking outside the box to provide richer, more creative feedback.

Qualitatively Speaking: How big pharma is misusing qualitative marketing research

Published
April 2010
Author
Laura Cusumano
Abstract
Qualitative shouldn’t be substituted for quantitative, nor should it be overlooked in favor of quantitative. Yet, the author argues, that’s just what some pharmaceutical firms are doing.