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Marketing Research Articles Related to New Product Research

Marketing Research Articles Related to New Product Research

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Wendy's research serves up The Big Classic

Published
February 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
For the Wendy's fast-food chain to compete with McDonalds or Burger King, executives realized that some serious market research was needed. After analyzing taste tests in six different cities, The Big Classic burger was born.

From the Publisher May 1988: Focus groups for business-to-business research

Published
May 1988
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Tom Quirk recounts his experience conducting B2B focus groups for new product research and attributes the project's success to careful recruiting and modertating.

Research encourages a comprehensive redesign of Blue Nun packaging

Published
October 1989
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
After conducting taste tests that confirmed that packaging was a factor in declining sales, Blue Nun wine held extensive focus groups with current and past consumers and competitive brand purchasers, as well as shelf tests, in its package re-design process.

Research guides Holiday Corp.'s creation of a lodging chain for business travelers

Published
February 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Holiday Corporation purchased consumer panel mail survey results to track trends in consumer travel habits. It also performed several follow-up research projects, including focus groups and follow-up telephone and mail surveys with panelists, to find out what features Homewood Suites would have to meet the specific needs of the target market and to test two potential concepts for its facilities.

Research helps maker of gardening containers expand its product line

Published
October 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
To determine the marketing potential of an indoor planter product, researchers applied a variety of research methods: a review secondary research, trade publications and sales materials; retail audits; in-store interviews; consumer and trade member interviews; and telephone interviews with retail buyers and distributors.

The product management/marketing research partnership

Published
April 1991
Author
Paul Colburn
Abstract
This article highlights methods of developing a working partnership between brand management and marketing research.

Focus groups guide creation of environmental insurance product

Published
December 1991
Author
Mary Ellen Gallagher
Abstract
To create its new environmental insurance product, ERIC Group Inc. used focus groups including executives who would make the ultimate decision on a purchase as well as people who would most likely influence the top decision maker. The 25 focus groups resulted in significant changes to the policy, such as who and what it would cover.

Research with travelers helps Samsonite develop a convenient new line of luggage

Published
February 1992
Author
Bob Bengen
Abstract
Samsonite Corporation applied a range of quantitative and qualitative research strategies as it developed its Piggyback line of luggage. The company used exploratory focus groups to help determine the travel needs, one-on-one interviews to test initial and drawings depicting conceptual designs, field tests of sample products and surveys of potential users.

The case for a control cell

Published
April 1992
Author
Norman Frendberg
Abstract
When developing studies to test a new product, researchers often only measure reactions to the new product. The author argues that researchers should also compare these reactions to those related to a control product in order to truly understand consumer acceptance of the new product. Two possible methodologies are discussed.

The Missouri Lottery tests new games with focus groups

Published
November 1992
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
The Missouri Lottery and research firm Market Directions tested new potential lottery games and monitored public attitudes toward the lottery in general by conducting numerous quantitative and qualitative studies. This article describes one focus group research effort aimed at choosing games for a particular year. Participants from several locations in the state were asked to "shop" among 15 mock-ups for $30 worth of tickets.

The secrets of good product testing

Published
November 1993
Author
Jerry W. Thomas
Abstract
This article describes uses of and strategies for ensuring accurate and actionable product testing. It also describes the four most widely used product testing designs: monadic, sequential monadic, paired-comparison and protomonadic.

Some thoughts on developing new products

Published
November 1995
Author
Jerry W. Thomas
Abstract
Every product eventually becomes obsolete. Constant improvement and new product development are crucial to a company’s continued success. This article discusses new product development.

Using metaphors in focus groups can help tap consumer creativity

Published
December 1995
Authors
Charlotte Rettinger and Ann Brewer
Abstract
Consumer creativity is important when determining the positioning of a new product, but getting focus group participants to be creative isn’t easy. This article discusses how to use metaphors in focus groups to help tap consumer creativity.

Maxfli puts a new spin on its golf ball line

Published
May 1997
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Maxfli used a variety of qualitative and quantitative approaches to guide logo, packaging and advertising redesign in an effort to create a niche in the multimillion-dollar golf industry.

Why consumers don't understand your concept even though it passed qualitative testing with flying colors

Published
December 1997
Author
Ernest Potischman
Abstract
New product launches have a failure rate of greater than 90 percent, even when qualitative testing shows success. This article discusses what goes wrong with a bell-ringing new product concept in the transition from qualitative to quantitative assessment that befouls its communication to the target consumer. The article also outlines steps to take to get around new product roadblocks.

Creativity is lurking inside your company: Do you know how to find it?

Published
February 1998
Author
Michelle Taufman
Abstract
Innovation isn't necessarily born from creative or marketing departments alone. A company's staff members may be just what the company needs for generating ideas. This article discusses internal idea generation, including tips for conducting a successful internal idea generation session.

Getting the most from new product research

Published
February 1998
Author
Steve Mamarchev
Abstract
Research results depend on a variety of factors, including the quality of the information given to the researcher prior to the project. Communication between client and researcher at a project's inception is extremely important in new product research. This article discusses new product research. Specifically, the article addresses the need to research the client before working with consumers and provides the 10 most common consumer questions that are addressed from concept generation and product development and refinement to evaluation and tracking.

Using virtual reality-based conjoint to capture the voice of the customer

Published
May 1998
Authors
Lisa Wood, Dean Hering, Mohan Bala and Todd Romig
Abstract
When demand for a new product is highly uncertain and prototypes are expensive to develop, a research approach where potential customers evaluate hypothetical products can be extremely useful. This article describes use of TradeOff VRTM, which combines conjoint analysis and virtual reality to obtain customer feedback regarding the product design and planning process for a new Volvo truck.

Using trade-off analysis to shape your new product

Published
May 1999
Author
Richard "Dick" McCullough
Abstract
It would be nice to have a crystal ball to foresee answers to a variety of product development questions. This article discusses trade-off analysis as such a crystal ball.

Customer-driven concept and product development

Published
January 2000
Authors
Camille Nicita and Christi Walters
Abstract
Success or failure of a new product depends on the creation of differentiation in the marketplace. The purpose of this article is to introduce several qualitative techniques for gaining a comprehensive, customer-driven focus for product and concept development. The four areas explained are: 1) gathering the “voice of the customer,” 2) identifying purchase triggers/need states, 3) understanding emotional constructs or core emotional values, and 4) determining brand image.