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Marketing Research Articles Related to New Product Research

Marketing Research Articles Related to New Product Research

Showing items 1-20 of 86.

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A framework for understanding ad effectiveness

Published
April 2009
Author
Isabelle Albanese
Abstract
The author outlines her 4Cs of Truth in Communications process to explain how it can help frame and inform ad research projects. Marketers can use the concepts of comprehension, connection, credibility and contagiousness to make sure their ads resonate with consumers.

A look at the power of the design, the formula and the brand in taste testing

Published
August 2008
Author
Neil Kalt
Abstract
Using cola taste tests as a framework, the author explores the role and power of brand names and the design of the research process on consumer reactions and perceptions.

A qualitative approach to consumer-based concept development

Published
December 2005
Author
Judith Lerner
Abstract
A method for building concept statements with consumers to get at what is truly important to them is outlined. Words or phrases are written on cards and shown to respondents, who sort them based on relevance, appeal and similarity. The underlying emotional reasons for the sort can be probed, leading to insights into consumer motivation that might not otherwise be apparent.

Add some strategy to your concept evaluation process

Published
April 2009
Author
Kevin Dona
Abstract
Assessing the prospects of a new product concept takes more than a cookie-cutter approach. Each concept requires its own set of strategies for how it will be presented to consumers in testing and a careful analysis of how the new idea fits corporate and brand objectives.

Adding ‘prosumers’ to your groups can provide a creative boost

Published
May 2009
Author
Steve Richardson
Abstract
Under the right circumstances, including - rather than excluding - marketing professionals normally screened out of focus groups can lead to breakthroughs. Examples from British Airways and WD-40 are cited to illustrate how this approach has helped develop new products and services.

Alternative qualitative approaches in new product research

Published
June 2003
Author
Larry A. Zaback
Abstract
So much has been written concerning the “actionable limitations” of focus groups that it’s not surprising to hear some researchers groaning for forthright guidance when exploring new products and concepts. This article addresses how a “fresh” look at new product exploration opens the door to a host of alternative research methodologies. The discussion includes an example of how continuous improvement in the workplace can be addressed using similar non-traditional qualitative research tools.

An online community keeps beverage firm Cafédirect close to its customers

Published
January 2013
Author
Richard Young
Abstract
Cafédirect’s online community serves as a tangible expression of the coffee and tea maker’s core values and has also demonstrated a healthy ROI.

Blueprints to successful concept development

Published
February 2003
Authors
Camille Nicita and Christi Walters
Abstract
Successful product development requires a solid foundation. This first of two articles introduces the four cornerstones of successful concept development: consumer wants and needs, emotional connections, brand equity, and competitive landscape.

Blueprints to successful concept development

Published
March 2003
Authors
Camille Nicita and Christi Walters
Abstract
The second of a two-part series on successful concept development, this article explains the tactical process and specific qualitative and quantitative tools for evaluating and enhancing concepts that lead to products consumers will love.

By the Numbers: Practices you can trust

Published
July 2004
Author
Lee Smith
Abstract
An overview of the use of online conjoint analysis and its capabilities.

By the Numbers: Sample quality: selecting one from many

Published
January 2009
Author
Stephen J. Hellebusch
Abstract
Using a real-life example of a line extension, the author shows the impact that sample quality can have on testing the viability of a new product concept. In this case, factors related to low incidence made the research results tell an incomplete story.

Concept development, Survivor-style

Published
August 2008
Author
Martha E. Guidry
Abstract
Drawing inspiration from the reality TV series Survivor, the author explains how the show's tagline can serve as a model for the concept development process.

Creativity is lurking inside your company: Do you know how to find it?

Published
February 1998
Author
Michelle Taufman
Abstract
Innovation isn't necessarily born from creative or marketing departments alone. A company's staff members may be just what the company needs for generating ideas. This article discusses internal idea generation, including tips for conducting a successful internal idea generation session.

Customer-driven concept and product development

Published
January 2000
Authors
Camille Nicita and Christi Walters
Abstract
Success or failure of a new product depends on the creation of differentiation in the marketplace. The purpose of this article is to introduce several qualitative techniques for gaining a comprehensive, customer-driven focus for product and concept development. The four areas explained are: 1) gathering the “voice of the customer,” 2) identifying purchase triggers/need states, 3) understanding emotional constructs or core emotional values, and 4) determining brand image.

Data Use: An alternative to finding the best of the best

Published
April 2009
Author
Thomas Murphy
Abstract
Ranking long feature lists is an onerous task for respondents. This article explores the pros and cons of various approaches to using the Bradley-Terry method to assign scores to tested features.

Data Use: The insidious top-box and its effects on measuring line share

Published
August 2008
Author
Bob Gertsley
Abstract
The popular top-box measure has serious flaws because it can mislead marketers with data that may be statistically significant but answers an irrelevant business question. Instead of relying on top-box, the author argues for choice experiments, which more accurately differentiate among similar concepts, more effectively measure cannibalization and make it easier to assess the overall impact of line extensions on a business.

Designing medical products for the global economy

Published
November 2000
Authors
Tammy Humm Donelson and Bryce G. Rutter
Abstract
Medical products are particularly sensitive to cultural influence because the differences in medical practices throughout the world are considerable. This article discusses designing medical products for the global market using cross-cultural research, including avoiding common pitfalls, when to use cross-cultural research, defining procedures, incorporating a study control, and costs.

Don't shoot your ideation session in the foot

Published
May 2003
Author
Gregg Fraley
Abstract
There is a growing need in the research industry for consultants who specialize in assisting corporations with new product development. This article discusses nine ways to avoid shooting yourself in the foot as you plan and execute your next ideation session.

Finding a clear path to new ideas

Published
March 2006
Author
Daila Boufford
Abstract
Delphi interviews - in which non-competing professionals whose areas of expertise have been identified as having an impact on a potential research project’s objectives - can serve as vehicle for uncovering new and unexpected ideas and strategies.

Focus groups guide creation of environmental insurance product

Published
December 1991
Author
Mary Ellen Gallagher
Abstract
To create its new environmental insurance product, ERIC Group Inc. used focus groups including executives who would make the ultimate decision on a purchase as well as people who would most likely influence the top decision maker. The 25 focus groups resulted in significant changes to the policy, such as who and what it would cover.