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Marketing Research Articles Related to Observation Research

Marketing Research Articles Related to Observation Research

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House calls help Y&R understand consumers

Published
April 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
New York advertising agency Young and Rubicam believes on-site interviews are one of the best ways to understand the connection between consumer and product, by seeing consumers in their natural environments. While a lot of research is involved, the process gives companies an accurate view of how consumers actually think and feel in their natural environment.

Researchers can learn from ethnography

Published
April 1993
Author
Sally Ringo
Abstract
This article explores potential benefits of applying ethnography in qualitative research to understand the meaning of consumer behaviors.

Observational research in a focus group setting

Published
December 1993
Author
Alice Rodgers
Abstract
To get in-depth information about the ways people learn to assemble, install or use a product, the author suggests using a focus group setting that closely replicates an expected usage site. The author’s research with this technique found a variety of mechanical abilities among participants as well as a wide range of expectations about the experience and the impact such expectations have on the learning experience.

Understanding Hispanic culture: a case for ethnographic research

Published
April 1997
Author
Roberta Maso-Fleischman
Abstract
As the Hispanic market expands, companies are increasing their research of this market. This article examines the ethnographic study and illustrates how it can be used to enrich Hispanic research.

Seven rules for observational research: how to watch people do stuff

Published
December 1997
Author
Walt Dickie
Abstract
Observational research is becoming a popular method, yet many clients are not comfortable with it simply because they don't know how to get value from watching people. This article discusses seven rules for observational research that will help client and moderator alike.

In-home research gives Mirro the ingredients for its Allegro cookware line

Published
January 2000
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Cookware maker Mirro Company wanted to develop a product for the department and specialty store market. For help with the design work and marketing research, it turned to Metaphase Design Group, which sent three-person teams to observe and videotape people at home using their cookware during meal making. Observational interviews, Buddy Groups, questionnaires and research of consumer product safety information resulted in a new cookware design.

Web-based observational research helps fine-tune e-shopping tool

Published
July 2000
Author
Jeffrey S. Robbins
Abstract
Soliloquy Inc. combined Web observational and opinion research to fine-tune Expert, its front-end interface for online vendors that allows shoppers to find what they want through a two-way interactive online conversation.

To make a product successful, conduct satisfaction research before you introduce it

Published
October 2000
Author
Tammy Humm Donelson
Abstract
Most companies concentrate their customer satisfaction research after the buying experience. This article discusses the importance of conducting customer satisfaction research before product development - even before product conception.

Moen designs new showerhead after ethnographic research uncovers host of innovation opportunities

Published
June 2002
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Moen conducted depth interviews, in-aisle research, observational research and hydrotherapist interviews to understand the beneficial effects of water on the body in research to improve its line of showerheads.

Qualitatively Speaking: Firsthand experience or secondhand information?

Published
March 2002
Author
Cara Woodland
Abstract
This article discusses how firsthand experience is preferable to secondhand information, noting the success of having consumers from a Western Union research study present their recommendations to Western Union’s executive committee.

Trade Talk: Stranded in the soup aisle

Published
February 2003
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
This article discusses research by Sorenson Associates in which the firm has been mapping individual grocery shopping trips using PathTracker, a small electronic transmitter mounted on shopping carts that emits signals every four seconds that are tracked by an array of antennae in a store.

Use corporate ethnography to understand and reignite your brand

Published
May 2003
Author
Gerry Cain
Abstract
In an increasingly turbulent business environment, corporate ethnographic research may just be the tool today’s companies need to develop the competitive edge necessary for survival. To capitalize on your brand’s inherent power, you must understand your own organization. This article discusses using corporate ethnography to gain insight into a brand and the inherent nature of that brand based upon a greater understanding of the organizational culture itself.

Why companies should ignore the voice of the customer

Published
May 2003
Author
Douglas Ryan
Abstract
Listening to customers can often be a bad idea. This article discusses why traditional marketing research techniques for obtaining market feedback may not work and how watching is superior to listening. The article offers guidelines for observing customers.

Trade Talk: A look at our new look; going ethno in San Fran

Published
January 2004
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Background on the redesign of Quirk’s and a summary of highlights from the ethnographic research-related programming at the 2004 IIR Market Research Event.

Observational research is a practical alternative to full-scale ethnography

Published
December 2004
Author
Phil Harriau
Abstract
Rather than a full-scale ethnographic research process, in many cases information needs can be filled by simply observing consumers as they interact with your product.

An overview of Web site assessment techniques

Published
January 2006
Author
Tema Frank
Abstract
A look at the drawbacks and advantages of several methods of testing Web sites, from focus groups (online and offline) to lab-based usability testing and unsolicited customer feedback.

The fusion of Web 2.0 and contextual research methods creates the opportunity for something new

Published
July 2006
Author
Steve August
Abstract
Online-based immersive research draws from a number of offline approaches - ethnography, longitudinal qualitative studies and contextual inquiry - and blends them, taking advantage of the capabilities offered by Web 2.0. The goal is to capture participant experiences as they happen and make them meaningful in the context of a business question.

Using ethnography to spark new product ideas

Published
December 2005
Author
Hy Mariampolski
Abstract
Watching consumers interact with products can lead to new product ideas by observing consumers’ frustrations and workarounds with current products.

In-situ research in Latin America

Published
November 2005
Author
Martha C. Rivera
Abstract
An in-depth look at ethnographic research in Latin America, including thoughts on modes of observation, participation, incentives and questioning.

Moms use remote digital ethnography to capture their child-transport troubles

Published
February 2007
Author
Kari McGlynn
Abstract
Mobile devices were used as the primary data gathering tool in a study that asked mothers to detail the hassles they encounter when transporting their kids. Audio verbatims and digital photographs were among the various forms of documentary evidence submitted by respondents.