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Marketing Research Articles Related to One-on-One (Depth) Interviews

Marketing Research Articles Related to One-on-One (Depth) Interviews

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In-depth interviews with dealers yield many benefits for farm equipment manufacturer

Published
April 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Farm equipment manufacturer the Gehl Company conducted in-depth interviews with dealers from around the country that were selected to be part of its dealer council. Council members distributed forms to dealers in their area to identify concerns to bring to the dealer council meeting. The company used this council input to determine priorities for the coming year.

Regaining a foothold

Published
December 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Spreckels Sugar Company conducted one-on-one interviews with a cross-section of both light and heavy users of sugar to delve into their attitudes and behavior towards sugar. It then developed product concepts based on this input and tested them in a second round of one-on-ones. Mock-ups of new packaging concepts were then subjected to in-home use tests. During test-marketing, survey cards were distributed to get reactions from consumers in the marketplace.

Focus groups tell California-based mountain bike maker its ad campaign is a winner

Published
March 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To develop a new advertising strategy to apply to market its mountain bikes. Specialized Bicycle Components Inc. conducted one-on-one interviews with employees about what they thought about mountain bike advertising in the industry magazines It then used focus groups with current and prospective riders to determine their psychological makeup and test its new marketing brochure.

Boston Edison uses research to measure the success of an energy conservation program

Published
December 1991
Author
Mary Lynn Spada
Abstract
Boston Edison conducted a comprehensive study to answer questions about its Lite Lights energy conservation program's four major components: program delivery, target market, promotion and estimation of energy savings. The company used a broad range of research strategies: in-depth one-on-one interviews, focus groups, phone interviews and customer surveys.

Packaging research guides positioning of 3M's innovative line of wood care products

Published
October 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
3M tested a number of packaging designs for its line of wood care products to make sure that the packaging would communicate key ideas and the benefits to both novice and experienced woodworkers. The computer-generated designs experimented with different names for the products (such as Safe Strip, Strip Safer) and informational taglines below the product name to explain the product benefits. The main research methods used were eye-tracking and one-on-one interviews.

Respondents in focus groups, one-on-ones endorse fun-loving Libbey Glass ad campaign

Published
December 1992
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Researchers first explored five potential Libbey Glass advertising campaigns using focus groups. In the second phase, one-on-one interviews with mall intercepts tested the top three campaigns from the focus group phase, ultimately pointing to a clear winner with enthusiastic responses from consumers.

Research with business customers drives Georgia-Pacific Corp.'s massive reorganization effort

Published
April 1993
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
After a merger between Georgia-Pacific Corporation and Great Northern Nekoosa Papers, researchers applied a three-pronged strategy to determine how to structure different parts of the new company. They used one-on-one interviews with senior management of the key merchant distributors of G-P's papers, focus groups with printers and designers who were major users of Hopper and Nekoosa premium papers, and quantitative surveys of office paper buyers, printers and designers.

One-on-ones help Finlandia distill a winner

Published
December 1994
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Finlandia used one-on-one interviews in the development of a new product: Arctic Cranberry vodka.

Qualitative research helps Stanley Hardware reposition its line of mirror doors

Published
November 1994
Authors
Susan Haller and Dale Benedict
Abstract
Stanley Hardware used focus groups with homeowners and contractors and one-on-one interviews with distributors and retailers in its efforts to reposition its line of mirror doors.

Maker of design software uses telephone interviews to keep in touch with customers around the world

Published
April 1995
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Synopsys used one-on-one telephone interviews with integrated chip designers and managers in the United States, Germany and Japan to obtain feedback from customers worldwide.

Spending a little time getting to know respondents can improve your qualitative learning

Published
March 1995
Author
Tim Huberty
Abstract
The research relationship can be cold. This article discusses how interviewers should take time to get to know respondents as individuals. Doing so is valuable when researching one-on-one and in focus groups because consumers are more likely to open up and offer unsolicited insights to someone who has earned their trust. Spending an extra five minutes to get to know respondents may result in more insightful information that will have the credibility of a personality behind it.

VeriFone conducts wide-ranging international research project to develop new product concept

Published
November 1996
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
VeriFone used international quantitative research to assess the viability of a new product.

Qualitative advertising communication checks: 10 rules to guarantee great creative choices

Published
March 1997
Author
Pamela Rogers
Abstract
In any marketing research career, you will be asked to participate in a qualitative advertising communication check, a process no one is particularly fond of. This article outlines 10 rules to guarantee great creative choices.

One-on-ones help manufacturing firm understand customer concerns

Published
April 1998
Author
David C. Lang
Abstract
Waltco Truck Equipment used surveys and in-depth telephone interviews to guide product tweaking, position, pricing and promotions.

Face/Off: A pharmaceutical projection technique

Published
December 1998
Author
Murray Simon
Abstract
One-on-ones with health care professionals can be challenging. This article discusses pharmaceutical Face/Off, a role-playing technique that may be a helpful research tool with a variety of professionals.

The art and science of effective qualitative interviews

Published
December 1998
Author
Naomi R. Henderson
Abstract
To get the right results, you need the right tool. This article discusses in-depth interviews, including appropriateness, researcher selection, benefits and drawbacks, respondent recruitment, pricing and data analysis.

Online research: playing to the Web's strengths

Published
July 1998
Author
Amy Yoffie
Abstract
A company conducted online focus groups to learn about the relationship between its product and GenXers. In addition, the company conducted face-to-face focus groups.

Go in-depth with depth interviews

Published
April 2000
Author
Brad Kates
Abstract
Market researchers have several methods at their disposal. Using three case studies as examples, this article discusses when to use the depth interview as a research method. The article also discusses conducting depth interviews.

Combining online and traditional methods to enhance qualitative studies

Published
June 2002
Author
Lisa Kindig
Abstract
Depending on the project, pairing face-to-face and online methods may be the most efficient and effective way to gather information. This article discusses the two methods of research.

Successful in-depth research among senior financial executives

Published
April 2003
Author
John A. Laurino
Abstract
Conducting effective market research among senior financial executives is notoriously difficult. This article discusses a methodology for obtaining rich, actionable and timely data from senior financial executives.