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Marketing Research Articles Related to Online Surveys

Marketing Research Articles Related to Online Surveys

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10 reasons why you should go mobile right now

Published
July 2013
Authors
Bob Yazbeck and Susan Scarlet
Abstract
The authors offer a mobile research manifesto, addressing some common complaints against mobile and outlining the many factors in its favor.

A report on the 2009 Globalpark Market Research Software Survey

Published
July 2010
Authors
Tim Macer and Sheila Wilson
Abstract
This time around, results show that larger research companies are leading the charge when it comes to adopting mobile research techniques and, in spite of all the industry buzz, online communities have not yet taken off.

A report on the 2010 Globalpark Market Research Software Survey

Published
May 2011
Authors
Tim Macer and Sheila Wilson
Abstract
This iteration of the annual survey of research software users added questions on social media usage and deployment of sample routers and found that CATI seems to be holding its own.

A report on the Confirmit Market Research Software Survey

Published
August 2012
Authors
Tim Macer and Sheila Wilson
Abstract
The annual study of research software users finds curious levels of resistance toward smartphone-using respondents and a growing need for skilled data visualizers.

A report on the Confirmit Market Research Software Survey

Published
June 2013
Authors
Tim Macer and Sheila Wilson
Abstract
Among the highlights in this recap of the annual study of software and technology usage by research companies are ongoing struggles with survey length and a marked commitment to quality control.

Ad agency uses Web-based qualitative with teens to help develop public-service campaign

Published
May 2009
Authors
Dana Slaughter and Kristin Schwitzer
Abstract
The authors used online qualitative research to test several facets of a proposed public-service campaign aimed at getting teens to stop using the phrase “That’s so gay.” Respondents created and posted photo-journals, evaluated potential celebrity spokespeople, reacted to ad concepts and offered insights on how to motivate teens without coming across as preachy.

All together now: How client participation can enrich research

Published
April 2010
Author
Greg Cobb
Abstract
The division of labor between research vendors and research clients can sometimes be a detriment to a research project, as the client's knowledge of the industry is underutilized. The author suggests that in certain cases, greater insight can be gathered through increased client participation.

An analysis of the past 20 years of client-side research buying

Published
October 2011
Author
Emily Goon, Quirk's Content Editor
Abstract
Two decades’ worth of data from the Quirk’s circulation database is examined to discover what shifts have taken place in the research industry - including the advent of online and the latest economic crisis - and to predict where it might be headed.

Analyzing the words people use in online dialogs

Published
January 2004
Author
Peyton Mason
Abstract
By analyzing transcripts of online focus groups, researchers can uncover a respondent’s unspoken motivations and feelings, which can in some way compensate for the lack of visual feedback such as body language, which is not observable online.

Are researchers ready for Web 2.0?

Published
July 2008
Author
Steve Richardson
Abstract
Web 2.0, characterized by more consumer-generated content and more interaction between and among Web users and Web sites, has affected some forms of qualitative research and forced research providers to adapt accordingly.

By the Numbers: A choice in the matter

Published
February 2014
Author
Matthijs Visser
Abstract
What happens when you let respondents choose their feedback method?

By the Numbers: Conducting research in an extraordinary economic climate

Published
June 2009
Authors
Keith Malo and John Widmer
Abstract
The authors offer several suggestions for maximizing research budgets during tough times, including eliminating projects that don’t add value, changing methodologies and using free or low-cost Web-based resources to keep tabs on the competition.

Choosing the right approach comes down to serving each project's needs

Published
July 2008
Author
Sonya Turner
Abstract
With many methods available, each with its own pros and cons, determining which form(s) of online qualitative to use - from bulletin boards to communities - comes down to a matter of project needs.

Conducting Web site usability research

Published
January 2004
Author
Jacob Brown
Abstract
The author focuses on how qualitative and quantitative methods can be used to test Web site usability. Both families of methods have their pros and cons and researchers may have to use hybrid approaches to get the information they need.

Considerations in quantitative data collection in China

Published
November 2009
Author
David Ying Hon Ho
Abstract
Conducting commercial quantitative research in China presents methodological and cultural issues that either don’t exist or that have already been solved in Western society. Researchers must take heed in this relatively-virgin territory and adapt their strategies to cater to China’s unique circumstances.

Data Use: A systematic method for checking online questionnaires

Published
October 2011
Author
Jerry Arbittier
Abstract
The author explains how his firm’s BOWLSR technique can avoid survey instrument - based problems with online research.

Data Use: Trying to bring the numbers alive

Published
February 2012
Authors
Jyanping Rung, Benjamin Woll and Carl Edstrom
Abstract
A report on efforts to fuse behavioral, psychographic and demographic information to identify segments and track marketing results.

Ethnography-based hybrid research stretches four continents to study workplace interaction

Published
November 2012
Author
Brian Green
Abstract
Herman Miller conducted a global hybrid research project to observe how people behave and collaborate in the office to inform new product development.

Faster than a speeding survey: Part II: The physician's perspective

Published
July 2009
Authors
Terri Maciolek and Jeffrey Palish
Abstract
In the second part of a two-part series on online surveys with physicians, the authors explore doctors’ reasons for participating in the research process and examine the factors that can lead to speeding and cheating.