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Marketing Research Articles Related to Packaging Testing

Marketing Research Articles Related to Packaging Testing

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Packaging research - evaluating consumer reaction

Published
October 1987
Author
Elliot Young
Abstract
Effective packaging is an essential part of product marketing, and consumer research is needed to determine the most effective packaging. There are many factors to determine before the product hits the shelf. Focus groups, mall intercept interviewing and test market auditing are three effective tools, and researchers have developed others to determine shelf impact.

Packaging change boosts coffee's identity

Published
October 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
A change in packaging has turned the Johann Jacobs brand of coffees into a viable competitor in the coffee industry. Visibility and projected imagery tests helped create a more contemporary design to make the coffee stand out on supermarket shelves.

Research improves sweetener packaging

Published
October 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
When NutraSweet Co., Chicago, makers of Equal sugar substitute, wanted to compete with sugar as a healthier substitute, serious marketing research was needed. Shelf visibility tests and label communication T-scope tests were used to create new, more-effective packaging.

Innovative packaging keeps Campbell's at market forefront

Published
October 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Packaging is one of the most important and least understood, elements of product marketing. Campbell Soup reviews demographic information and market trends to keep its packaging ahead of the curve and remain a market innovator.

Package program evaluates strength of package designs

Published
October 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
The Design Visibility Lab (DVL), developed by NOVA Research Inc., goes beyond subjective consumer opinions to measure the visibility and strength of a package. DVL uses a series of six instruments to determine the effectiveness of packaging in an objective manner.

Research shows risk of package redesign

Published
October 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
General Foods completed a study to determine customer reactions to a proposed re-design of the packing for Crystal Light. The researchers used one-on-one interviews, followed by an individual simulated shopping experience in an environment where the participant could be observed through a one-way mirror. The final part of the interview included personifying Crystal Light, describing various attributes.

Label research spices sales of Henri's dressings

Published
October 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Henri's Food Products conducted focus groups to determine which redesigned packaging labels might help address the declining sales of its reduced calorie salad dressings. Henri's also distributed a sales brochure for grocery buyers admitting its previous labeling mistakes and comparing the old label to the Edsel.

Regaining a foothold

Published
December 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Spreckels Sugar Company conducted one-on-one interviews with a cross-section of both light and heavy users of sugar to delve into their attitudes and behavior towards sugar. It then developed product concepts based on this input and tested them in a second round of one-on-ones. Mock-ups of new packaging concepts were then subjected to in-home use tests. During test-marketing, survey cards were distributed to get reactions from consumers in the marketplace.

Consumers tell Searle Canada it's time to update sweetener packaging

Published
October 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Searle Canada tested new packaging prototypes for its sweetener by conducting interviews with mall-goers, having them compare the new design to the current packaging.

Stiefel Laboratories hopes updated packaging will attract new users without alienating current consumers

Published
October 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Using customer surveys, Stiefel Laboratories discovered that some of its soap users purchased the product on impulse rather than on a doctor’s recommendation. With the goal of increasing these impulse buys, the tested two new potential packaging designs. Using a simulated store shelf planogram, researchers determined how quickly the Oilatum box was seen and how long respondents looked at it. Consumers then viewed the designs separately to determine the points on the packaging they noticed first, second, etc. The researchers used eye tracking and verbal interviews to collect data.

Packaging research guides positioning of 3M's innovative line of wood care products

Published
October 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
3M tested a number of packaging designs for its line of wood care products to make sure that the packaging would communicate key ideas and the benefits to both novice and experienced woodworkers. The computer-generated designs experimented with different names for the products (such as Safe Strip, Strip Safer) and informational taglines below the product name to explain the product benefits. The main research methods used were eye-tracking and one-on-one interviews.

Europeans discover T-Scope for packaging research

Published
November 1993
Author
Tony Siciliano
Abstract
The tachistoscope, or T-Scope, is a slide projector with a timing device that allows visual stimuli to be exposed at fast and consistently accurate speeds. This article describes two case studies that applied T-Scope techniques.

Brawny takes a giant step into research

Published
November 1994
Author
Jack Weber
Abstract
The James River Corp. used focus groups as part of a nine-month research project that examined all phases of its Brawny brand franchise.

Can we really measure creativity?

Published
March 1998
Author
Jonathan Asher
Abstract
Many companies may think that packaging research is unnecessary and that it is time-consuming and expensive with little return to the creative process. This article discusses packaging research, including pre- and post-design research, instances when research is not merited and how to measure effectiveness.

Are consumers receptive to innovative packaging structures?

Published
June 1999
Author
Elliot Young
Abstract
Product success is directly related to consumer receptivity to products and packaging. This article discusses packaging, including a study of a plastic beer bottle.

Advertising and packaging; Your product's voice and face

Published
March 1999
Author
Gene Leichter
Abstract
Advertising, naming and packaging should work together to promote your brand. This article discusses the importance of product advertising and packaging.

Research insights to guide global packaging decisions

Published
April 2002
Author
Scott Young
Abstract
Global packaging certainly offers tremendous benefits in terms of economies of scale, but there is also a minefield of challenges in developing effective global packaging. This article offers several insights for dealing with these challenges and guidelines for evaluating global packaging systems.

Tips on testing packaging among seniors

Published
December 2002
Author
Gail Fudemberg
Abstract
Baby Boomers are an increasingly important segment of the population. This is a group that needs special consideration from manufacturers and advertisers in addressing their needs. This article discusses conducting packaging research with seniors, including how not to use research.

Five principles for global packaging research

Published
November 2004
Author
Scott Young
Abstract
Recommendations for global packaging research include: focus on functionality; don’t rely on a single number; and remember that competition is the norm.

Let the designers design and the researchers research

Published
January 2006
Author
Michael Carlon
Abstract
While it is commendable that some design firms have taken it upon themselves to conduct consumer research on packaging concepts, they lack the objectivity to make major decisions based on that research. Those decisions should remain in the hands of the client company. The author outlines how design firms and client companies can structure their use of research to the fullest advantage of both parties.