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Marketing Research Articles Related to Online Panels

Marketing Research Articles Related to Online Panels

Showing items 1-20 of 112.

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Trade Talk: Re-thinking the youth market

Published
February 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Using beauty and cosmetics research as a reference, Irma Zandl weighs in on how today's youths are not what marketers expect.

BASES builds on online panel

Published
July 1999
Author
Joseph Marinelli
Abstract
ACNielsen BASES used the Internet to create a cost-efficient way to conduct more surveys in less time without compromising forecast accuracy: the BASES e-Panel.

Ask yourself a few questions at the outset to make sure you get the data you need

Published
May 2002
Authors
Seymour Sudman and Brian Wansink
Abstract
Given the widespread use of consumer panel techniques in marketing work, nearly every marketing executive or researcher concerned with consumer goods will have to consider this technique in their work. Detailing 11 tips, this article outlines the principal factors to keep in mind when selecting a consumer panel service.

Using panel research to penetrate the Asian market

Published
November 2002
Author
Albert Fitzgerald
Abstract
With some 500 million people online worldwide, the Internet has succeeded in bringing the world community together. This article discusses using online panels to research the Asian market, including establishing and maintaining the panel and limitations.

Are you talking to the right people? The importance of online panel quality

Published
July 2003
Author
Hugh Davis
Abstract
The ability to obtain market feedback is now more important than ever, as corporate decision makers must make quick, yet well-informed business decisions. Online research offers benefits beyond speed and cost. This article discusses the benefits of online research, as well as the importance of opt-in participation, response rates, recruitment, best practices and considerations.

Conducting Web site usability research

Published
January 2004
Author
Jacob Brown
Abstract
The author focuses on how qualitative and quantitative methods can be used to test Web site usability. Both families of methods have their pros and cons and researchers may have to use hybrid approaches to get the information they need.

Validating overnight sampling with an online research panel

Published
January 2004
Authors
Nicole Cicogna and Paul Curran
Abstract
Some researchers have wondered if the rapid pace at which online surveys can be completed has introduced some of the same problems associated with overnight phone studies. The authors argue for the use of replicate sampling, which divides the sample frame into mini-samples, which researchers work one at a time to prevent a certain type of consumer from being disproportionately represented in the final data set.

Is data from a representative online panel more valid?

Published
January 2004
Author
John J. Lewis
Abstract
The author, who works for a research panel provider, argues that different online research resources and techniques can yield very different results. Knowing the effects of these factors, some of which are outlined via a research-on-research-style report, is essential to making the correct business decisions and to taking full advantage of all the Internet has to offer.

Online surveys help Paramount Parks keep respondents and visitors happy

Published
July 2004
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
The director of research for theme-park company Paramount Parks details his use of online and other surveys to measure guest satisfaction.

Techniques for identifying problem respondents in online surveys

Published
July 2004
Author
Bill MacElroy
Abstract
An overview of the current thinking on how to thwart dishonest survey respondents.

Panelists talk about their online survey experiences

Published
July 2004
Author
Christopher De Angelis
Abstract
Respondents in Survey Sampling International’s online panels explain why they participate in the research process.

A study of non-response patterns

Published
January 2005
Authors
Kurt Knapton and Steve Myers
Abstract
Based on results of an analysis of e-Rewards panel data, the authors explore non-response bias and discuss its effects.

Guidelines for building a successful B2B panel

Published
March 2005
Author
Steve McCurdy
Abstract
Faced with the task of finding sometimes hard-to-find business respondents, some firms are turning to creating their own business-to-business panel. The author presents an overview of the process of creating such a panel and outlines the benefits of doing so.

Online communities require ongoing care and attention

Published
July 2005
Author
Michael T. Foley
Abstract
Drawing on surveys of panel respondents on why they participate in the research process, the authors discuss the steps needed to maintain and grow an online panel.

Has data collection improved or gotten worse?

Published
July 2005
Author
Harvey Lauer
Abstract
From telephone and mail research to online, the author charts the progress of data gathering and calls into question whether the Internet is the savior many view it as.

By the Numbers: European research panels growing, adapting

Published
November 2005
Author
Andrew Cooper
Abstract
While European panels have been slower to develop than U.S. panels, they are now up to speed and represent a host of cultures, languages and countries.

Trade Talk: ESOMAR panel research conference shines

Published
November 2005
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
A report on ESOMAR’s panel research conference

Online panels improving, evolving

Published
November 2005
Author
Gerry Philpott
Abstract
Online panels improving, evolving

Panel respondents tell what gets them to participate

Published
November 2005
Author
Janet Westergaard
Abstract
An online survey of Web panel respondents sheds light on why respondents participate and the importance of incentives.

How to nurture your online panel

Published
November 2005
Authors
Beth Rounds and Heidi Dickert
Abstract
Research-on-research shows that minimizing turnover and maximizing the “fun factor” are two keys to ensuring panel quality and health.