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Marketing Research Articles Related to Product Positioning Studies

Marketing Research Articles Related to Product Positioning Studies

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Focus groups aid positioning of new boiler control technology

Published
April 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To determine how to market a new boiler system technology and identify the target audience, Cleaver-Brooks conducted focus groups with prospective buyers from a variety of industries and applications, such as hospitals, manufacturing plants, schools and universities. Via an earpiece, the moderator received coaching from company observers throughout the focus group process to ask follow-up probing question or to rephrase questions. Field tests with sample customers were also completed.

Reader survey helps new magazine keep up with changes in the recording industry

Published
May 1990
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
To identify audience interest and needs for EQ, a music recording publication, researchers mailed a survey to potential readers. The study inventoried advertisements in industry publications to estimate the potential market share and it employed informal interviews with industry contacts to ascertain the market potential. The researchers also tested potential titles by asking regional and national distributors to respond to dummy magazine covers.

Research helps maker of gardening containers expand its product line

Published
October 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
To determine the marketing potential of an indoor planter product, researchers applied a variety of research methods: a review secondary research, trade publications and sales materials; retail audits; in-store interviews; consumer and trade member interviews; and telephone interviews with retail buyers and distributors.

Packaging research guides positioning of 3M's innovative line of wood care products

Published
October 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
3M tested a number of packaging designs for its line of wood care products to make sure that the packaging would communicate key ideas and the benefits to both novice and experienced woodworkers. The computer-generated designs experimented with different names for the products (such as Safe Strip, Strip Safer) and informational taglines below the product name to explain the product benefits. The main research methods used were eye-tracking and one-on-one interviews.

Focus groups tell Ethan Allen its redesigned logo stylishly combines the old and the new

Published
November 1992
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Ethan Allen conducted focus groups to create a logo that communicated the changes at Ethan Allen while preserving existing customer loyalty. The focus groups gathered input from long-term customers, recent customers and potential customers.

Respondent collages help agency develop ads for new Pontiac

Published
March 1995
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Pontiac used qualitative research to develop advertising for the new Sunfire. Specifically, respondents created 20” x 20” collages prior to the focus group that reflect their relationship with their car.

First-time use of Kano method helps Carrier Corp. research buyers of its air conditioning units

Published
November 1997
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Carrier Corporation conducted face-to-face interviews with potential commercial and residential users of the company's ductfree systems in Italy, Spain, Korea and Singapore using the Kano method to determine if the same product could be used in every market and the possible impact on customer satisfaction of doing so and to understand if there were market-differentiation possibilities.

Franchise extension

Published
November 1999
Author
Harry Vardis
Abstract
Companies frequently consider franchise extension. This article is a starting point to discuss the issues regarding line and franchise extensions that concern clients.

How a medical diagnostics company incorporated customer input at every step

Published
June 2000
Author
Eileen Moran
Abstract
A medical diagnostics company used a multi-step approach for incorporating customer input into the development of a major new product from scratch: collect the voice of the customer, generate internal performance measures, generate features and solutions, and customer evaluation of features/solutions.

Use of the Kano method keeps Honeywell attuned to the voice of the customer

Published
April 2001
Authors
Karen P. Goncalves and Michelle P. Goncalves
Abstract
Honeywell Corp. uses a multi-step process that includes the Kano method survey to determine which products to develop or change and how development resources should be allocated, meeting its most important goal of providing relevant customer input in decisions making.

Research uncovers new markets, new directions for Coleman

Published
December 2001
Author
Cara Woodland
Abstract
Coleman used a variety of qualitative research techniques to find new areas of business and revenue.

Ad agency uses focus groups to help reposition Duke's mayonnaise

Published
March 2001
Author
Dick Scott
Abstract
C.F. Sauer Company asked four groups of 45 mayonnaise users to give up the substance for a week in an attempt to uncover its allure and help reposition the Duke mayonnaise brand.

Schnapps maker looks to find out how feminine is too feminine

Published
December 2003
Author
Robert Sims
Abstract
Sazerac Company Inc. used focus groups in the development of a new schnapps bottle design that would appeal to women without alienating men.

How simulators can aid successful pharmaceutical product launches

Published
June 2004
Author
Kent Stephan
Abstract
Computer simulations can be effective predictors of a new pharmaceutical product’s success or failure but there are factors particular to the medical industry that must be taken into consideration

Did the product stop pushing consumers’ emotional buttons?

Published
December 2005
Authors
Elizabeth Lajoie and Gerry Katz
Abstract
A product can be a functional performance “superstar” but still lack the right emotional messaging, as the project profiled in this article found. Emotional mapping of individual brands helped the client understand how customers perceived the product’s marketplace.

Ignoring research findings can be very costly

Published
February 1989
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Sales and marketing personnel tend to be positive types who look for the good things about the products and services they sell while minimizing shortcomings of those same products and services. These traits are necessary if they are to be successful in their jobs. This article provides a case history that illustrates how a client’s internal factors can thwart the results of valid research.

Laddering, mapping lead the way to better positioning

Published
June 2008
Author
Patrick Quinlan
Abstract
This article explores the use of the laddering technique and of perceptual mapping as ways to explore product and service categories and develop marketing communication and positioning strategies.

Minnesota Mutual charts efficient marketing with MAPS

Published
April 1989
Author
Nance Olson
Abstract
Minnesota Mutual combined PRIZM, VALS and NFO data with existing purchasing information to develop Mortgage Audience Profiling System (MAPS), a marketing segmentation system to reach its most critical database: potential customers. With various database and segmentation information available via computer, Minnesota Mutual’s sales attempts can be that much more effective.

Testing product names

Published
March 1989
Author
Ira N. Bachrach
Abstract
Name function tests aren’t really about names but the effect of the name on the consumer’s expectations of the product. This article—an excerpt from a chapter in the book Making Names—discusses using adjectival analysis to compare consumers’ expectations of a product with one name versus expectations of the same product with another name.

Data Use: Multidimensional scaling for market research

Published
July 1989
Author
Tony Babinec
Abstract
Multidimensional scaling is a powerful tool that helps market researchers determine brand or product position, or find market segments. This article discusses MDS, providing multiple examples, including metric and nonmetric.