Skip to: Main Content / Navigation

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Add This

Marketing Research Articles Related to Product Purchasing Studies

Marketing Research Articles Related to Product Purchasing Studies

Showing items 1-20 of 30.

Go

Sort

Refine Search

Date

Login required for most articles published within the last three years

"Gimme what you've got"

Published
February 1999
Author
J. Kevin Bokeno
Abstract
Impulse-buying behavior is increasing in traditionally high-involvement categories and in day-to-day purchases. This article discusses how time constraints have been the dominant theme of the buying experience in the ‘90s.

A look at the buying process model

Published
June 2009
Author
Sharon S. Paik
Abstract
This article explains a method called the buying process approach, which helps pharmaceutical firms closely examine how patients move through the health care system. By identifying areas where problems occur and understanding how those problems affect patients’ use of health care brands, marketers can design strategies to overcome roadblocks.

A process for improving packaging research ROI

Published
January 2011
Author
Scott Young
Abstract
The author explains how companies can maximize their investments in packaging research by following five best practices: validating, screening, benchmarking, innovating and integrating.

By the Numbers: Under the influence

Published
May 2010
Author
Stephen J. Hellebusch
Abstract
The author replicated an experiment from Predictably Irrational to better understand the impact that arbitrary coherence might have on marketing research studies.

Data Use: Arbitrary incoherence, or, a failure to replicate

Published
December 2010
Author
Stephen J. Hellebusch
Abstract
In a follow-up to his May 2010 article on the same topic, the author reports on his attempts to further investigate the impact - or lack thereof - of arbitrary coherence.

Data Use: Conjoint evolves into discrete choice modeling

Published
October 1990
Author
Robert Roy
Abstract
This article profiles discrete choice modeling which, unlike conjoint modeling, does not require pairing of all attributes. Therefore, unrealistic products are not produced. The respondent does not rate, sort or rank-order, but instead acts as if he or she is in the marketplace, selecting which product to buy.

Data Use: Determining product feature price sensitivities

Published
November 1990
Author
Joseph Curry
Abstract
This article discusses several approaches to determining customer price sensitivities – analyzing actual sales as a function of price, laboratory purchase experiments and preference studies where buyers are asked to express their purchase likelihoods for a product at various price levels. The article then describes the use and advantages of a form of conjoint analysis that allows researchers to estimate both feature prices and the overall price in order to better measure price sensitivities of consumers.

Defining the system of needs in an industrial market

Published
April 1991
Author
Cliff Havener
Abstract
Researchers conducted needs research by interviewing individuals with influence upon purchasing decisions for an air compressor product in their companies. The article discusses the interviewing strategies that led from a discussion of the broader context to specific questions about the product and problems with it.

How do vehicle owners feel about hybrids?

Published
August 2008
Author
Scott Pimley
Abstract
Reports on a survey of hybrid-vehicle owners, which questioned the drivers' reasons for purchase, satisfaction with their purchase, expectations toward gas mileage and preferences for alternative fuels.

How gathering customer purchase stories can spark innovation

Published
December 2011
Author
Gerald Berstell
Abstract
The author explores the value of asking consumers about their purchase processes and cites examples of how doing so led to product and service breakthroughs.

How P&G used agile research to keep up with consumers

Published
May 2013
Author
Matt Warta
Abstract
The need for immediacy has spurred the development of the agile research methodology, an iterative approach to give researchers real-time insight and the power to make changes on the fly. Procter & Gamble shares its experience using agile research for holiday-season fragrance marketing.

In Case You Missed It... November 2009

Published
November 2009
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
News and notes on marketing and research: men's underwear and the economy; free shipping offers and holiday shopping; Tokyo marketing cafe for young, affluent women

Intelligent design: Packaging food with purpose

Published
August 2013
Author
Len Pollack
Abstract
This article addresses how packaging affects sales and what messages different styles communicate.

Leveraging mobile and online qualitative to get inside shoppers’ heads

Published
July 2013
Authors
Jim Bryson and Jessica Ritzo
Abstract
The authors detail how to combine mobile and Web-based qual approaches to study the complete shopping experience.

Make sure your research methods are helping - not hindering - your menu optimization efforts

Published
March 2009
Author
Brad Barash
Abstract
When considering menu changes, restaurants must consider not only the performance of the new items but also the interaction of those items with the existing bill of fare. The article maintains that standard TURF-based research approaches to menu optimization have flaws and that an online-based method using virtual menus is more effective.

Moms and their (mis)perceptions of processed foods

Published
April 2011
Author
Barbara Katz
Abstract
At the Institute of Food Technologists' annual wellness conference, HealthFocus International convened a panel of five mothers to discuss U.S. perceptions and understanding of processed foods.

Putting choice modeling to work for new product sales forecasting

Published
May 2010
Author
Jerry W. Thomas
Abstract
The author discusses the differences between 21st-century choice modeling vs. old legacy forecasting systems and explains how choice modeling can offer a distinct advantage in being 3-D-compatible and simpler way to achieve more complete results.

Quality vs. quantity: A process for identifying the best of the best B2B respondents for new product research

Published
April 2014
Author
Kip Creel
Abstract
This article outlines a B2B concept testing project that StandPoint conducted with Kimberly-Clark that included a co-creation exercise between the product development team and end users.

Research shows risk of package redesign

Published
October 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
General Foods completed a study to determine customer reactions to a proposed re-design of the packing for Crystal Light. The researchers used one-on-one interviews, followed by an individual simulated shopping experience in an environment where the participant could be observed through a one-way mirror. The final part of the interview included personifying Crystal Light, describing various attributes.

Retail study examines shopping habits in two ethnically diverse California cities

Published
November 1992
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
WSL Marketing conducted phone interviews to study women’s shopping patterns in two ethnically diverse California cities. This article reports on the study’s main findings.