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Marketing Research Articles Related to Product Testing Research

Marketing Research Articles Related to Product Testing Research

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The case for a control cell

Published
April 1992
Author
Norman Frendberg
Abstract
When developing studies to test a new product, researchers often only measure reactions to the new product. The author argues that researchers should also compare these reactions to those related to a control product in order to truly understand consumer acceptance of the new product. Two possible methodologies are discussed.

Focus groups, conjoint analysis help develop the Ameritech/Household Int'l. Complete MasterCard

Published
May 1992
Author
Mary P. Tonneberger
Abstract
Ameritech and Household International relied on qualitative and quantitative research strategies to develop a credit card concept combining the features of a MasterCard and a telephone calling card. The study involved focus groups and a conjoint analysis in which participants completed a computerized questionnaire in which they isolated the combination of features that most appealed to them by keying their answers to a detailed series of questions.

The Missouri Lottery tests new games with focus groups

Published
November 1992
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
The Missouri Lottery and research firm Market Directions tested new potential lottery games and monitored public attitudes toward the lottery in general by conducting numerous quantitative and qualitative studies. This article describes one focus group research effort aimed at choosing games for a particular year. Participants from several locations in the state were asked to "shop" among 15 mock-ups for $30 worth of tickets.

The secrets of good product testing

Published
November 1993
Author
Jerry W. Thomas
Abstract
This article describes uses of and strategies for ensuring accurate and actionable product testing. It also describes the four most widely used product testing designs: monadic, sequential monadic, paired-comparison and protomonadic.

User interface testing becomes accessible and cost-effective

Published
February 1997
Author
Cheo Massion
Abstract
User interface research and usability technology are useful tools for understanding how customers will respond to new software versions, but these methods can be quite expensive. This article discusses user interface testing and its less-expensive portable version.

Testing product innovations: a case history

Published
January 1997
Author
Ben Luden
Abstract
Without disclosing the exact nature of the innovation to respondents, General Electric used multiple-part independent research to determine the viability of product innovation.

In-home research gives Mirro the ingredients for its Allegro cookware line

Published
January 2000
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Cookware maker Mirro Company wanted to develop a product for the department and specialty store market. For help with the design work and marketing research, it turned to Metaphase Design Group, which sent three-person teams to observe and videotape people at home using their cookware during meal making. Observational interviews, Buddy Groups, questionnaires and research of consumer product safety information resulted in a new cookware design.

Designing medical products for the global economy

Published
November 2000
Authors
Tammy Humm Donelson and Bryce G. Rutter
Abstract
Medical products are particularly sensitive to cultural influence because the differences in medical practices throughout the world are considerable. This article discusses designing medical products for the global market using cross-cultural research, including avoiding common pitfalls, when to use cross-cultural research, defining procedures, incorporating a study control, and costs.

The seven golden rules of styling/design research

Published
February 2001
Author
John S. Gongos

Adaptation and innovation: successful product development in the Information Age

Published
November 2003
Authors
Douglas Malcom and Susan Spaulding
Abstract
The connectivity of the information economy is rapidly changing relationships between buyer and seller, product and service and employers and employees. This article discusses the importance of adaptation and innovation in the Information Age, including two case studies.

Product placement research moves into the 21st century

Published
January 2004
Author
Janet Savoie
Abstract
An overview of the various methods of placing products with consumers for the purposes of testing, including a look at the current state of what’s possible in terms of product placement for online testing. A number of researchers weigh in with their experiences with the various methods.

Hidden barriers to new product acceptance: preference inertia

Published
May 2004
Authors
Donna Wydra and Bill MacElroy
Abstract
Preference inertia, which prevents a target customer population from trying new things, can blunt sales by up to 40 percent. The factors behind it, and how to measure them, are the subjects of this article.

Qualitatively Speaking: Involving your core users

Published
December 2007
Author
Laura Morris
Abstract
Lego and other firms have profited from getting key customer groups involved in product development. This approach can lead to creating products that have a built-in audience as well as generating goodwill among core users of your products.

Make sure your research methods are helping - not hindering - your menu optimization efforts

Published
March 2009
Author
Brad Barash
Abstract
When considering menu changes, restaurants must consider not only the performance of the new items but also the interaction of those items with the existing bill of fare. The article maintains that standard TURF-based research approaches to menu optimization have flaws and that an online-based method using virtual menus is more effective.

Add some strategy to your concept evaluation process

Published
April 2009
Author
Kevin Dona
Abstract
Assessing the prospects of a new product concept takes more than a cookie-cutter approach. Each concept requires its own set of strategies for how it will be presented to consumers in testing and a careful analysis of how the new idea fits corporate and brand objectives.

Trade Talk: How the strong retailers are surviving

Published
April 2009
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
A report by Kurt Salmon Associates details how companies such as Apple and Trader Joe's have created product and service offerings that resonate with consumers. These retailers share certain operational competencies, which the report explores.

A look at the buying process model

Published
June 2009
Author
Sharon S. Paik
Abstract
This article explains a method called the buying process approach, which helps pharmaceutical firms closely examine how patients move through the health care system. By identifying areas where problems occur and understanding how those problems affect patients’ use of health care brands, marketers can design strategies to overcome roadblocks.

In Case You Missed It... November 2009

Published
November 2009
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
News and notes on marketing and research: men's underwear and the economy; free shipping offers and holiday shopping; Tokyo marketing cafe for young, affluent women

How Sony BMG used the Web to reach a disappearing audience

Published
February 2010
Author
Emily Goon, Quirk's Content Editor
Abstract
After losing a chunk of its audience to Web-based music consumption, Sony BMG teamed up with Globalpark to create an online panel of music fans to gain faster, deeper insight using “surveytainment.”

Brazilian hair care firm Beleza Natural thrives by keeping close to its roots

Published
February 2010
Authors
Hy Mariampolski, Leticia Moreira Casotti and Maribel Carvalho Suarez
Abstract
On-site visits help researchers understand the icons and ideals used by a Brazilian hair care firm to both inspire and form a bond with its working-class customers.