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Marketing Research Articles Related to Qualitative Research

Marketing Research Articles Related to Qualitative Research

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House calls help Y&R understand consumers

Published
April 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
New York advertising agency Young and Rubicam believes on-site interviews are one of the best ways to understand the connection between consumer and product, by seeing consumers in their natural environments. While a lot of research is involved, the process gives companies an accurate view of how consumers actually think and feel in their natural environment.

Raisin commercial gets rave reviews

Published
April 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
When Foote Cone & Belding set out to promote raisins for the California Raisin Advisory Board, the company employed clay animation, or Claymation, with huge success. The series of commercials tested very highly in focus groups and ended up appealing to people across the country.

Year-round schools to impact marketers

Published
December 1987
Author
Emmet Hoffman
Abstract
No one's sure if the trend will catch on, but marketers are taking notice of a renewed interest in year-round schools. There are many issues with the idea, but studies show that marketers might be affected by the trend.

Ignore mom when doing children research

Published
December 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
When conducting interviews with children, Karen Forcade, president of the Youth Research division at Consumer Sciences Inc., (CSI) Brookfield Center, Conn. insists that the best interviews are the ones without parents. Inviting parents into interviews will influence the children, making the interview less effective.

Minimizing client problems on focus group projects

Published
December 1987
Author
Naomi R. Henderson
Abstract
Moderator Naomi Henderson, founder and president of research firm RIVA, outlines ways to minimize focus group problems. Following certain steps can make focus groups more effective.

Research unravels bus riders' intimidation

Published
December 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Minneapolis-St. Paul’s Metropolitan Transit Commission needed to overcome many obstacles to increase and retain ridership on busses, especially for non-English speakers. Interviews, focus groups and questionnaires in different languages were employed to develop a marketing strategy that would make the bus system more hospitable and less threatening.

Child-adult qualitative designs yield richest data

Published
December 1987
Author
Diane Fraley
Abstract
The study of children as consumers is a complicated but valuable task. Child-centric product design tests and other qualitative research can yield rich data, but Diane Fraley of D.S. Fraley & Associates in Chicago knows that expertise is needed.

Research method tests boundaries of conventional wisdom

Published
February 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
While many qualitative research techniques reject experts from the field, a new technique, Delphi, is breaking new ground for market research by utilizing expert knowledge. The strategy has risks, but Delphi is helping clients access new information.

Ideas for achieving focus group results

Published
January 1987
Author
Tom Quirk, QMRR Publisher
Abstract
Focus groups and qualitative research can be valuable tools, but the research that works best is the research that's planned best. This article contains some of the essentials to think about before you start your next focus group.

Research assures short move is smooth one

Published
June 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
When a Midwestern clinic moved into a new facility, the clinic turned to marketing research firm Minnesota Medical Services Corp. (MMSC) to ensure a smooth transition. MMSC used a variety of research methods to work out any kinks before the clinic reopened its doors.

Research helps AT&T sharpen its newsletter

Published
March 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
When AT&T customers received their "Stay In Touch" newsletter with their long distance bill, most didn't realize the extensive market research that went into it. AT&T employed focus group sessions and mall intercepts to find out what type of newsletter would best appeal to customers.

Telefocus technique 'replaces' focus groups for firm's ad testing

Published
May 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Funk Seeds International, a worldwide seed operation headquartered in Bloomington, Ill., no longer gathers focus groups in a common location. As of three years ago, the company now connects all focus group participants through the telephone. The technique is cheaper and easier.

Packaging research - evaluating consumer reaction

Published
October 1987
Author
Elliot Young
Abstract
Effective packaging is an essential part of product marketing, and consumer research is needed to determine the most effective packaging. There are many factors to determine before the product hits the shelf. Focus groups, mall intercept interviewing and test market auditing are three effective tools, and researchers have developed others to determine shelf impact.

Restaurant chain uses mall intercepts to test products

Published
October 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Carousel Snack Bars of Minnesota Inc. needed to figure out a way to sell typically a male-consumed product - hot dogs - in a primarily female-populated location - shopping malls. The company turned to mall intercepts and focus groups to determine exactly how to do it.

A method for finding 'virgin' respondents

Published
December 1988
Author
Virginia Smith
Abstract
The researchers used a sample of their mailed survey respondents to a “Get Paid for Your Opinions” direct mail effort to explore the makeup of study recruits. Participants responded to a questionnaire through phone or mailed responses. This study is one of the first to combine information about lifetime experience in focus groups with reasons for wanting to participate in them, as well as demographic data.

Marketing research strikes American Bowling Congress

Published
December 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Researchers conducted focus groups and mail questionnaires to understand the needs of the American Bowling Congress’ current members in order to gain insight and direction for both retaining members and attracting new ones.

Using focus groups to collect quantitative data

Published
December 1988
Author
James M. Leiman, Ph.D.
Abstract
This article explores the potential to glean quantitative data when using focus groups. The author addresses concerns regarding lack of random sampling and small sample sizes.

Natural group interviewing

Published
December 1988
Authors
David J. Pagnucco and Robert P. Quinn, Ph.D.
Abstract
The article summarizes a proposed three-part study to explore joint decision making behavior. Methodologies included questionnaires, direct observations, videotaping and semi-structured interviews.

The solid gold focus group

Published
December 1988
Author
Harold C. Daume Jr.
Abstract
This article discusses what has led to rising costs of focus groups and 12 practical ways to reduce these costs and increase the utility of focus groups.

Poll shows youth hopeful about their lives, future

Published
February 1988
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Adults may fear an oncoming national crisis, but the American Chicle Youth Poll, a study conducted by the Roper Organization for the American Chicle Group of Warner-Lambert Co., reveals that teenagers and children are overwhelmingly happy and satisfied with their lives and their futures. The study was based in-person interviews that were validated over the phone.