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Marketing Research Articles Related to Sampling

Marketing Research Articles Related to Sampling

Showing items 1-20 of 65.

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A method for finding 'virgin' respondents

Published
December 1988
Author
Virginia Smith
Abstract
The researchers used a sample of their mailed survey respondents to a “Get Paid for Your Opinions” direct mail effort to explore the makeup of study recruits. Participants responded to a questionnaire through phone or mailed responses. This study is one of the first to combine information about lifetime experience in focus groups with reasons for wanting to participate in them, as well as demographic data.

Efficiency is key to random digit sampling

Published
May 1990
Author
Beth Wallace
Abstract
This article describes how sampling efficiency can affect research costs and highlights a new approach by Survey Sampling that identifies a large portion of the unproductive numbers in random-digit telephone samples without affecting the samples' integrity.

A common sense approach to dialing costs

Published
December 1990
Authors
Amy Starer and Dale Kulp
Abstract
This article discusses two methods of estimating the expected savings from eliminating non-working numbers from telephone-based research studies. One method estimates the average number of minutes in each hour that interviewers actually spend administering questionnaires. The second method assesses what the savings would be to develop a dialing rate per hour just for non-working numbers.

Data Use: Selection of a stratified random sample

Published
October 1993
Author
Steven J. Fuller
Abstract
This article explains the benefits of stratified random sampling and demonstrates how to construct such a sample using real data from a study of the market for patient monitors in U.S. hospitals.

Five myths about business-to-business telephone samples

Published
April 1995
Author
Amy Starer
Abstract
Business-to-business research is valuable and necessary. Growth in this area has led research organizations to enter unfamiliar territory and resulted in myths and misconceptions about sampling aspects of business-to-business research. This article discusses five myths of business-to-business telephone sampling, examines the reality and explains what is needed for successful research.

Key incidence issues when conducting research among Hispanics

Published
May 1995
Authors
David H. Taber and Doug Spaulding
Abstract
A good field supplier should ask a number of questions before quoting a price for any study. This article discusses special considerations for conducting Hispanic studies, particularly those conducted in Spanish.

Let's put survey errors in perspective

Published
February 1996
Author
Lee Slurzberg
Abstract
Conducting a national survey can be daunting. This article discusses the challenges of obtaining a national sample and suggests that the research industry strive for ways to increase completion rates, including demanding that clients allow more time to make callbacks.

A simple solution to nagging questions about survey, sample size and validity

Published
January 1999
Author
Susie Sangren
Abstract
The quality of a market analysis is judged by its validity. Unfortunately, data from non-probability, informal sample surveys lack measurable confidence. This article demonstrates an easy method of calculating the sample size needed for a specific market survey or experiment.

The incidence of understanding incidence

Published
April 1999
Author
Warren Pino
Abstract
One of the most critical yet often confusing measures in marketing research is incidence. This article discusses incidence, including defining and calculating incidence and addressing its impact on costs.

Practical sampling methods for low-incidence populations

Published
May 1999
Authors
Kevin J. O'Donnell and Peter Brownstein
Abstract
Until recently, most marketing research adhered to the law of randomness for sampling low-incidence populations, which required an abundance of time and money. This article discusses practical sampling methods for low-incidence populations.

Estimating sample size for a descriptive study in quantitative research

Published
June 1999
Author
Gang Xu
Abstract
Sample size often must be calculated in quantitative marketing research, which requires knowing the variable of interest. Using two cases, this article discusses the variable of interest.

Survey and sampling in an imperfect world

Published
April 2000
Author
Susie Sangren
Abstract
This article addresses the demands that arise in a random sample survey and their effects on sample, offers solutions, and proposes stratified random sampling as an alternative to help achieve the same level of accuracy as computed on a simple random sample with a reduced sample size.

Validating overnight sampling with an online research panel

Published
January 2004
Authors
Nicole Cicogna and Paul Curran
Abstract
Some researchers have wondered if the rapid pace at which online surveys can be completed has introduced some of the same problems associated with overnight phone studies. The authors argue for the use of replicate sampling, which divides the sample frame into mini-samples, which researchers work one at a time to prevent a certain type of consumer from being disproportionately represented in the final data set.

By The Numbers: A sample size table

Published
December 2006
Author
Paul C. Boyd
Abstract
The author offers a table for calculating the correct sample size to reach a desired confidence level and margin of error. Includes a link to an online table generator.

Qualitatively Speaking: Sampling for qualitative researchers

Published
March 2007
Author
Bonnie W. Eisenfeld
Abstract
Using a comparison to interior design, the author explains sampling and how it can affect the qualitative research process

By The Numbers: An update on the state of 'working phone rate'

Published
April 2007
Author
Linda Piekarski
Abstract
A look at how working phone rate is computed and where it stands today.

Comparing river respondents to panelists

Published
July 2008
Authors
Denise Brien, Melanie Courtright and Marjette Stark
Abstract
The authors conducted research-on-research to determine how, if at all, answers differed depending on how respondents were recruited and/or interviewed, whether by river sample, online panel or CATI.

By the Numbers: The pros and cons of sampling modes

Published
December 2008
Author
Linda Piekarski
Abstract
Sampling methodologies come in all shapes and sizes. This article looks at various approaches are explores the value of combining them to get the most useful results.

The importance of data quality in advertising decision-making

Published
April 2009
Authors
Ashley Grace and Ron Conlin
Abstract
In these harsh economic times, advertisers must put an emphasis on quality, both in terms of seeking to obtain high-quality data and also in making sure that the ad research they conduct adheres to high quality standards. The article outlines one research company’s multi-step guidelines for conducting quality-focused ad research.

Address-based sampling may provide alternatives for surveys that require contacts with representative samples of households

Published
May 2009
Authors
Mansour Fahimi and Dale Kulp
Abstract
This article examines factors contributing to researchers’ increased interest in address-based sampling (ABS) and looks at the pros and cons of ABS. Against a backdrop of declining response rates, ABS appears to offer a convenient framework for effective design and implementation of surveys that employ multimode alternatives for data collection.