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Marketing Research Articles Related to Survey Design

Marketing Research Articles Related to Survey Design

Showing items 1-20 of 224.

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Rating scales can influence results

Published
October 1986
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
A summarized excerpt of a U.S. Department of Commerce study testing the merits of a seven-point rating scale versus a 10-point rating scale.

3 questionnaire techniques on 'health events' reported

Published
February 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
The U.S. Department of Commerce has released a report called, "Approaches to Developing Questionnaires," that outlines the merits of a diary procedure, sample design and effective evaluation in marketing research. A summary is included in this article.

Attitude surveys keep phone company in touch

Published
June 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Southwestern Bell Telephone Company uses its Customer Attitude Survey (CAS) to determine customer perceptions about the company and strategize key areas to improve the success of the company. What sets CAS apart from other research techniques is that customers participated in the design of the survey. When areas that need more in-depth research are identified through CAS, focus groups are conducted.

Field testing the National Health Interview Survey evaluation questionnaire

Published
January 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
This article describes a three-phase testing process of a revised questionnaire. The researchers used a combination of qualitative observations of interviewers as well as quantitative analysis comparing the revised questionnaire with the original.

Avon researchers find that normal rules don't apply when testing among Hispanic women

Published
June 1990
Authors
Maisie Wong, Ayn Gelinas and Phyllis Rocha
Abstract
Before implementing its actual study, Avon conducted a pilot study to learn how to overcome some of the cultural barriers when involving the Hispanic population. This article summarizes the pilot study’s results, providing guidelines for screening and interviewing, study location and timing, questionnaire construction and incentive structures.

Patients tell a New York hospital that its service matches its strong reputation

Published
January 1991
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Discharged patients from Belleview Hospital were contacted by telephone two weeks after the end of their stay to take a three-minute patient satisfaction survey on their impressions of the hospital's service. The survey included categorical, interval-scale, and open-ended questions. Results from phone survey will be used to refine its written survey distributed to patients.

15 tips and techniques for survey research

Published
December 1992
Author
Gayle Kaplan
Abstract
This article offers 15 tips and techniques to think about before beginning survey research to obtain useful and valid information. Some areas discussed include survey design and wording, sampling issues, statistics tools, timing for telephone surveys, strategies for increasing responses to mailed surveys, and issues related to anonymity and confidentiality.

The qualitative/quantitative segue in health care marketing research

Published
January 1992
Author
Murray Simon
Abstract
This article discusses advantages of the health care industry using a qualitative/ quantitative segue approach to research. This methodology first uses a qualitative marketing research study to help define appropriate language, issues and areas of sensitivity. The results from this phase provide the basis for developing a subsequent quantitative study.

Increasing survey accuracy

Published
June 1992
Author
Norman Frendberg
Abstract
This article discusses ways of minimizing three types of survey errors: sampling error, observational error (incorrect measurements), and non-observational error (the inability to obtain information from qualified respondents).

Determining attribute importance

Published
October 1992
Author
Randy Hanson
Abstract
In a typical customer satisfaction study, respondents evaluate one or more products or services. Satisfaction on an overall basis is rated, followed by ratings on many individual attributes. This article addresses various strategies for determining which attributes are most important in determining overall satisfaction. It classifies these approaches into two main categories: stated attribute importance and derived attribute performance.

The importance of context in conducting Asian research

Published
December 1993
Author
Sandra M.J. Wong
Abstract
This article discusses how context in Asian marketing research affects selection of appropriate research sample/respondents; framing of questions to effectively gather meaningful information; and establishing a productive researcher/respondent relationship.

Changes in survey design that will make your data entry and processing go smoothly

Published
February 1993
Author
Eric DeRosia
Abstract
This article offers advice on how to prevent common data processing problems by taking preventative measures during the survey design process. The examples presented address telephone surveys, but the same principles apply to surveys conducted in malls, through the mail or any other data collection technique.

Through a mail survey, California PERS asks enrollees to evaluate satisfaction with 25 health plans

Published
January 1993
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
To evaluate satisfaction with 25 health plans, California Public Employees Retirement System (PERS) mailed a survey to enrollees, testing the questionnaire beforehand through public meetings, a focus group, telephone interviews, intercepts and suggestions and review by the PERS Health benefits Advisory Council and the State of California Department of Personnel Administration. PERS also conducted a series of focus groups to follow up on the survey results.

Do's & don'ts of customer satisfaction

Published
October 1993
Author
Joanne Ulnick
Abstract
This article offers 10 do’s and five don’ts when conducting customer satisfaction research. This advice covers topics such as sample selection, evaluation criteria, types of questions to ask, pre-tests and evaluation strategies.

Data Use: Scale scoring in health care customer surveys

Published
February 1994
Author
Scott MacStravic
Abstract
Almost all health care customer surveys use scales. This article discusses problems with using scales and the benefits of using an alternative system: value-based scaling.

Designing a customer satisfaction survey for industrial products

Published
April 1995
Author
Chris Van Derveer
Abstract
Marketing research of industrial products has grown rapidly in the past few years. Customer satisfaction is the hot topic in this area of research. This article discusses how to design a customer satisfaction survey for industrial products.

The exploratory open-ended survey question

Published
March 1995
Author
Jonathan E. Brill
Abstract
Survey items may take one of two fundamental forms: open-ended or closed-ended. This article explores the open-ended survey question, including its four purposes, problems with using questionnaires of this type and technique. The article also provides guidelines for using exploratory open-ended questions that will improve research.

Machine-readable surveys make it easier for utility’s customers to express their satisfaction

Published
October 1995
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Northern States Power (NSP) took advantage of new technology to improve surveys. This article discusses how NSP switched to and uses machine-readable image/OCR (optical character recognition) forms to survey customers.

Redesigned questionnaire helps American Express Financial Advisors assess effectiveness of client acquisition techniques

Published
February 1996
Author
D.L. Hudella
Abstract
American Express Financial Advisors improved assessment effectiveness of client acquisition techniques (CAT) by redesigning its CAT questionnaire. Improved response rates and other factors allowed its research department to provide high-quality data quarterly to internal partners for resource planning.

Customer satisfaction and choice modeling: a marriage

Published
October 1996
Author
Bill Etter
Abstract
When researching customer satisfaction, most practitioners bypass an opportunity to truly extend the value of the customer service information. This article discusses how the management "value gap" of satisfaction research can be closed by incorporating additional data and choice-modeling ideas.