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Marketing Research Articles Related to the Telecommunications Industry

Marketing Research Articles Related to the Telecommunications Industry

Showing items 1-20 of 66.

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Research helps AT&T sharpen its newsletter

Published
March 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
When AT&T customers received their "Stay In Touch" newsletter with their long distance bill, most didn't realize the extensive market research that went into it. AT&T employed focus group sessions and mall intercepts to find out what type of newsletter would best appeal to customers.

Attitude surveys keep phone company in touch

Published
June 1988
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
Southwestern Bell Telephone Company uses its Customer Attitude Survey (CAS) to determine customer perceptions about the company and strategize key areas to improve the success of the company. What sets CAS apart from other research techniques is that customers participated in the design of the survey. When areas that need more in-depth research are identified through CAS, focus groups are conducted.

Speed dialing

Published
December 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Sprint conducted focus groups with residential and business customer segments to make sure its customer satisfaction tracking program would measure service attributes that were important to customers. That information was used to construct the telephone surveys with its customers. For customers that express specific complaints during the telephone survey, the interviewer electronically sends the comments to Sprint for follow-up action that responds to that particular customer.

Research and marketing breathe new life into a mature product

Published
April 1991
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
Indiana Bell used focus groups of small business representatives to determine an appropriate advertising strategy for its Centrex product. The company then tested three different marketing approaches in three different markets and then measured the associated response rates in the markets as well as consumer attitudes pre- and post-marketing via survey research.

Focus groups, conjoint analysis help develop the Ameritech/Household Int'l. Complete MasterCard

Published
May 1992
Author
Mary P. Tonneberger
Abstract
Ameritech and Household International relied on qualitative and quantitative research strategies to develop a credit card concept combining the features of a MasterCard and a telephone calling card. The study involved focus groups and a conjoint analysis in which participants completed a computerized questionnaire in which they isolated the combination of features that most appealed to them by keying their answers to a detailed series of questions.

Survey tells AT&T how well its employees manage with managed care

Published
June 1994
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
AT&T uses a mail survey and feedback from local access meetings to gather information from employees about satisfaction with their health network providers and service.

Reducing customer churn

Published
April 2001
Author
Kathi McGregor
Abstract
In a way, packaged goods companies have a big advantage over service providers when fighting for market share. This article discusses customer churn and how companies, particularly those providing services, can quickly improve their bottom line and minimize future costs associated with replacing lost business by adding a well-designed churn study to customer loyalty efforts.

Eye-tracking helps fine-tune AT&T's customer service site

Published
July 2001
Authors
Sandra Marshall, Maritza DiSciullo and Tim Drapeau
Abstract
AT&T used eye-tracking to investigate how two groups of users interacted with its customer service home page.

Research shows importance of service level agreements as potential marketing tool for communications firms

Published
April 2002
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
While service level agreements (SLA) aren’t available to small-scale users, they are common in the business world. This article discusses a recent Web-based survey on SLAs conducted with 3,000 IT professionals.

Moving a telephone survey to the Web

Published
January 2004
Author
Heather Woodward
Abstract
Based on a case study of a Fortune 500 telecom company, the article outlines the difficulties of moving a phone survey to the Web. Specific tips are offered, including paying close attention to sampling, running a parallel test, and keeping questionnaires brief.

Trade Talk: Reading the tea leaves in Boston

Published
July 2004
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
A report on some of the highlights of the Marketing Research Association’s 2004 conference.

Pre-research planning helps Texas tech firm put findings in motion

Published
March 2005
Author
Laura Patterson
Abstract
Using a case history involving Texas-based Motion Computing, the article shows how a technology firm used research to define and refine new products.

Thoughts on the role of video and ethnography in marketing research

Published
December 2005
Author
Gavin Johnston
Abstract
While video cannot and should not eliminate the written report, it should have a greater role in the tool kit of the corporate researcher. A case history example involving cell phones in Japan is included.

Consumer Electronics Association uses online qualitative to get the 411 on kids and their phones

Published
February 2006
Author
Tara Hutton
Abstract
A week-long online study, in which respondents used blogs to record their phone usage and related experiences, helped the Consumer Electronics Association see how important cell phones are to pre-teen and teenaged kids.

Trade Talk: The Web drives sales, but not all by itself

Published
July 2008
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
A Pew study shows that while consumers do rely on the Web for information searches when shopping for products and services, in many cases they also consult in-store salespeople as part of the process.

The Net Promoter Score debate and the meaning of customer loyalty

Published
October 2008
Author
Bob E. Hayes
Abstract
The author, a Net Promoter Score (NPS) skeptic, argues that NPS isn't an accurate measure of or predictor of loyalty. Rather than relying on one metric, firms should use a number of loyalty questions to ensure that at-risk customers are identified.

By the Numbers: How to avoid language problems in international IT research

Published
November 2008
Author
Julia Lin
Abstract
Using five brief case-study examples, this article looks at problems that can crop up when fielding international studies in technology industries.

Women love smartphone features - hate shopping for them

Published
July 2009
Author
Quirk's Staff

You can learn some interesting things when you force consumers to stop using - or make them use too much of - a product

Published
December 2009
Author
Bryan Urbick
Abstract
Deprivation research, in which a consumer’s favorite product is withheld from them, is a useful market research tool but is more powerful when inundation research is run in tandem. Forcing product usage on a group of consumers can uncover equally compelling findings, the author argues.

In Case You Missed It... February 2010

Published
February 2010
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
News and notes on marketing and research: Verizon launches loyalty program; companies misuse marketing research; the five-second brand to reach Gen Y