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Marketing Research Articles Related to Telephone Interviewing/CATI

Marketing Research Articles Related to Telephone Interviewing/CATI

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A CATI system lowers Spiegel Inc.'s research costs and gives it a direct link to its customers

Published
February 1992
Author
Cheryl Ross
Abstract
This article describes Spiegel Inc.’s success using a computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) system to conduct its phone surveys. Benefits included speed, the ability to develop more complex, flexible question patterns and the ability to integrate database information of past behaviors with current attitudes expressed in the survey responses.

A Colorado HMO ties patient satisfaction to physician incentives

Published
November 1993
Authors
Charles Gaughan and Lori Muneta
Abstract
TakeCare HMO conducted a telephone satisfaction survey to gauge its primary-care physicians' performance in three crucial areas: access to care, physician care, and the office staff and environment. Rather than using a research firm to conduct these phone surveys, the HMO used specially trained employees.

A common sense approach to dialing costs

Published
December 1990
Authors
Amy Starer and Dale Kulp
Abstract
This article discusses two methods of estimating the expected savings from eliminating non-working numbers from telephone-based research studies. One method estimates the average number of minutes in each hour that interviewers actually spend administering questionnaires. The second method assesses what the savings would be to develop a dialing rate per hour just for non-working numbers.

A comparison of phone and online research

Published
January 2008
Author
Michael Hesser
Abstract
Telephone surveys have, in the past, been the method most used by research companies based on positive response rates and broad access to most U.S. households. With the continuing evolution of online surveys and the depth of Internet penetration, marketers and researchers must consider the pros and cons of each method carefully prior to commencing a research project. This overview discusses a variety of issues and considerations related to telephone and online survey research with the aim of providing direction for firms in the initial stages of developing or reviewing their approach to this area of research.

A government study investigates the issue of home taping and copyright violation

Published
May 1990
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
With extensive input from an advisory panel of stakeholders, a survey was developed to study consumer uses of home taping technology. The researchers delivered the survey in phone interviews. The questions addressed issues such as the importance of listening to music, type of material taped, reasons for taping, the extent of non-copyrighted material copied and feelings toward the ethics of home taping.

A look at business-to-business market research in Russia

Published
November 2010
Authors
Tatiana Klimenko and Matthew Harrison
Abstract
While business-to-business research is relatively new in Russia, its use is growing along with the size of the Russian economy. The authors detail some of the most-used techniques and offer insights for those considering investigating this vast market.

A look at some factors that affect telephone data collection costs

Published
May 2001
Author
Takako Komatsu
Abstract
In addition to choosing the right research methodology, market researchers must make sure that their projects meet budgetary goals. This article quantifies some common issues encountered by telephone data collection firms estimating the resources necessary to complete a project, including incidence and population.

A look at the state of business-to-business research

Published
April 2011
Authors
Larry Gold and Timothy Davidson
Abstract
The authors draw from a study of business-to-business research to examine the prevalence of B2B research and which techniques and methods are preferred.

A look at Web/phone hybrid survey development

Published
May 2002
Author
Albert Fitzgerald
Abstract
Despite the surge in popularity of online methods, telephone deployment remains a viable technique. Combining a traditional telephone approach with innovative online deployment methods may be just the way to achieve marketers’ goal of low-cost research with high-quality results. This article discusses using the Web and telephone together, including how it works, response rates and limitations. A case study is also discussed.

A maker of work scheduling software uses a telephone survey to meet varied information needs

Published
April 1992
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
TCS Management Group conducted a telephone survey with current customers of its TeleCenter System, which helps companies optimize work schedules. The study’s main objectives were to update its customer database, measure the level of satisfaction among software users and their managers, and determine the likelihood of attendance at the upcoming Users Forum.

A method for finding 'virgin' respondents

Published
December 1988
Author
Virginia Smith
Abstract
The researchers used a sample of their mailed survey respondents to a “Get Paid for Your Opinions” direct mail effort to explore the makeup of study recruits. Participants responded to a questionnaire through phone or mailed responses. This study is one of the first to combine information about lifetime experience in focus groups with reasons for wanting to participate in them, as well as demographic data.

A report on the 2008 Confirmit Market Research Software Survey

Published
May 2009
Authors
Sheila Wilson and Tim Macer
Abstract
Findings from the annual Confirmit Market Research Software Survey show that firms feel they aren’t getting everything they need from existing software. As a result, they are developing their own programs and actively open to switching to those of other providers.

A report on the 2010 Globalpark Market Research Software Survey

Published
May 2011
Authors
Tim Macer and Sheila Wilson
Abstract
This iteration of the annual survey of research software users added questions on social media usage and deployment of sample routers and found that CATI seems to be holding its own.

A report on the Confirmit Market Research Software Survey

Published
June 2013
Authors
Tim Macer and Sheila Wilson
Abstract
Among the highlights in this recap of the annual study of software and technology usage by research companies are ongoing struggles with survey length and a marked commitment to quality control.

A two-prong approach to B2B customer satisfaction research

Published
April 2013
Author
John Coldwell
Abstract
The author suggests that a best practice for B2B customer satisfaction research should include two parallel systems: ongoing telephone interviews and periodic in-depth surveys.

Accountemps relies on surveys to keep tabs on personnel

Published
February 1987
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
For Accountemps, a temporary-help service, research was needed to improve the productivity of its workers. Vice presidents and personnel management were surveyed to find helpful hints on how to improve productivity.

Address-based sampling may provide alternatives for surveys that require contacts with representative samples of households

Published
May 2009
Authors
Mansour Fahimi and Dale Kulp
Abstract
This article examines factors contributing to researchers’ increased interest in address-based sampling (ABS) and looks at the pros and cons of ABS. Against a backdrop of declining response rates, ABS appears to offer a convenient framework for effective design and implementation of surveys that employ multimode alternatives for data collection.

After more than a decade of Web surveys, online findings still depart from phone survey results

Published
July 2005
Author
Allen Hogg
Abstract
This research-on-research draws from several studies to examine differences between online findings and results from phone surveys. Results from surveys on different topics - media usage, brand awareness, etc. - are cited.

Americans prefer U.S. goods, unknowingly buy foreign ones

Published
May 1987
Author
Beth Hoffman, Quirk's Managing Editor
Abstract
While Americans prefer buying American-made products, and feel guilty when they buy foreign-made products, many people lack the requisite knowledge to do so. The result is that Americans who would prefer American-made products end up buying foreign products unknowingly.

An analysis of the past 20 years of client-side research buying

Published
October 2011
Author
Emily Goon, Quirk's Content Editor
Abstract
Two decades’ worth of data from the Quirk’s circulation database is examined to discover what shifts have taken place in the research industry - including the advent of online and the latest economic crisis - and to predict where it might be headed.