Skip to: Main Content / Navigation

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Add This

Marketing Research Articles Related to Usability Testing

Marketing Research Articles Related to Usability Testing

Showing items 1-20 of 39.

Go

Sort

Refine Search

Date

Login required for most articles published within the last three years

A maker of work scheduling software uses a telephone survey to meet varied information needs

Published
April 1992
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
TCS Management Group conducted a telephone survey with current customers of its TeleCenter System, which helps companies optimize work schedules. The study’s main objectives were to update its customer database, measure the level of satisfaction among software users and their managers, and determine the likelihood of attendance at the upcoming Users Forum.

A primer on conducting usability research

Published
January 2002
Authors
Steve Ellis and Pamela Ellis
Abstract
Users often don’t follow through on Web sites the way companies would like, the result of which is millions of dollars spent on Web site redesign. This article discusses the most important aspect of any Web site: its usability.

A report on the 2010 Globalpark Market Research Software Survey

Published
May 2011
Authors
Tim Macer and Sheila Wilson
Abstract
This iteration of the annual survey of research software users added questions on social media usage and deployment of sample routers and found that CATI seems to be holding its own.

An overview of Web site assessment techniques

Published
January 2006
Author
Tema Frank
Abstract
A look at the drawbacks and advantages of several methods of testing Web sites, from focus groups (online and offline) to lab-based usability testing and unsolicited customer feedback.

Beating your competitors: comparing the usability of products

Published
June 1999
Author
Jin Li
Abstract
Because competition in the marketplace is fierce, having a competitive advantage often leads to product success. In the world of technology, users are no longer simply impressed by features, but demand an integrated set of tools that solve their business problems. This article proposes a higher-level approach for performing competitive evaluation to gather qualitative and quantitative usability and design information.

By the Numbers: How to use research to measure an app's impact

Published
October 2013
Author
Jason Jacobson
Abstract
Your company’s app is a critical link to your consumers. Here’s a quick look at measuring its effectiveness.

Conducting Web site usability research

Published
January 2004
Author
Jacob Brown
Abstract
The author focuses on how qualitative and quantitative methods can be used to test Web site usability. Both families of methods have their pros and cons and researchers may have to use hybrid approaches to get the information they need.

Customer improves Oregon utility's power outage reporting system

Published
December 1997
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Portland General Electric used usability tests and focus groups to make the company's power outage telephone reporting system more user-friendly.

Designing medical products for the global economy

Published
November 2000
Authors
Tammy Humm Donelson and Bryce G. Rutter
Abstract
Medical products are particularly sensitive to cultural influence because the differences in medical practices throughout the world are considerable. This article discusses designing medical products for the global market using cross-cultural research, including avoiding common pitfalls, when to use cross-cultural research, defining procedures, incorporating a study control, and costs.

Ethnography-based hybrid research stretches four continents to study workplace interaction

Published
November 2012
Author
Brian Green
Abstract
Herman Miller conducted a global hybrid research project to observe how people behave and collaborate in the office to inform new product development.

Eye-tracking helps fine-tune AT&T's customer service site

Published
July 2001
Authors
Sandra Marshall, Maritza DiSciullo and Tim Drapeau
Abstract
AT&T used eye-tracking to investigate how two groups of users interacted with its customer service home page.

Get creative: Seven solutions to improve usability studies

Published
April 2013
Author
Pamela Walshe
Abstract
This article outlines how seven research methodologies not traditionally employed in user experience research can improve usability studies.

How online observational techniques help qualitative researchers keep pace with the speed of consumers

Published
February 2010
Author
Matt Schroder
Abstract
Honda (UK) used Web-based usability and ethnography techniques to fine-tune the interface of its Web site’s used-car-buying section, allowing it to make a number of adjustments and better understand car seekers’ preferences.

How qualitative research helped AARP reach a new audience with its LifeTuner site

Published
February 2012
Author
Kelly Hancock
Abstract
Uncertain of how prominently to brand a new site offering financial advice for 25-to-34-year-olds, AARP relied on one-on-one interviews for guidance.

Innovation research: Stay centered with these three principles

Published
July 2010
Author
Barbara Rugen
Abstract
Observation and follow-up interviews are at the core of successful innovation research, along with understanding what's required of a product; designing for individuals; and bettering offerings through usability testing.

Insurance company combines methods for Web site usability research

Published
July 2004
Authors
Nancy Bristow and Kenneth Yang
Abstract
Using an insurance company that was researching adding a feature to its Web site as an example, the article shows how site usability research can have both a qualitative and a quantitative component.

Integrating market research into the Web site development process

Published
July 1999
Author
Jeff Rosenblum
Abstract
With the explosion of the Internet, a Web site can help a company become or stay competitive. This article discusses integrating market research into Web site development and strategy.

It's the user satisfaction, stupid

Published
January 2004
Author
Sarah Hiner
Abstract
Though corporate Web sites are not products in the literal sense, they serve as powerful brand image communicators. While companies conduct large amounts of research on their actual products and services, many err by failing to seek user input when developing or refining their Web sites - which can lead to alienated or frustrated users. The author provides a brief overview of the steps companies should take to gauge their site’s usability.

Mixing old and new qualitative methods

Published
May 2012
Authors
Curtis Kaisner and Karen Lindley
Abstract
The same technologies that are changing our lives as consumers are also changing our abilities as researchers. Here’s a look at how traditional and tech-based qualitative tools can be successfully married.

Observational research in a focus group setting

Published
December 1993
Author
Alice Rodgers
Abstract
To get in-depth information about the ways people learn to assemble, install or use a product, the author suggests using a focus group setting that closely replicates an expected usage site. The author’s research with this technique found a variety of mechanical abilities among participants as well as a wide range of expectations about the experience and the impact such expectations have on the learning experience.