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Marketing Research Articles Related to Usability Testing

Marketing Research Articles Related to Usability Testing

Showing items 1-20 of 39.

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A maker of work scheduling software uses a telephone survey to meet varied information needs

Published
April 1992
Author
Quirk's Staff
Abstract
TCS Management Group conducted a telephone survey with current customers of its TeleCenter System, which helps companies optimize work schedules. The study’s main objectives were to update its customer database, measure the level of satisfaction among software users and their managers, and determine the likelihood of attendance at the upcoming Users Forum.

Observational research in a focus group setting

Published
December 1993
Author
Alice Rodgers
Abstract
To get in-depth information about the ways people learn to assemble, install or use a product, the author suggests using a focus group setting that closely replicates an expected usage site. The author’s research with this technique found a variety of mechanical abilities among participants as well as a wide range of expectations about the experience and the impact such expectations have on the learning experience.

User interface testing becomes accessible and cost-effective

Published
February 1997
Author
Cheo Massion
Abstract
User interface research and usability technology are useful tools for understanding how customers will respond to new software versions, but these methods can be quite expensive. This article discusses user interface testing and its less-expensive portable version.

Seven rules for observational research: how to watch people do stuff

Published
December 1997
Author
Walt Dickie
Abstract
Observational research is becoming a popular method, yet many clients are not comfortable with it simply because they don't know how to get value from watching people. This article discusses seven rules for observational research that will help client and moderator alike.

Customer improves Oregon utility's power outage reporting system

Published
December 1997
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Portland General Electric used usability tests and focus groups to make the company's power outage telephone reporting system more user-friendly.

Beating your competitors: comparing the usability of products

Published
June 1999
Author
Jin Li
Abstract
Because competition in the marketplace is fierce, having a competitive advantage often leads to product success. In the world of technology, users are no longer simply impressed by features, but demand an integrated set of tools that solve their business problems. This article proposes a higher-level approach for performing competitive evaluation to gather qualitative and quantitative usability and design information.

Integrating market research into the Web site development process

Published
July 1999
Author
Jeff Rosenblum
Abstract
With the explosion of the Internet, a Web site can help a company become or stay competitive. This article discusses integrating market research into Web site development and strategy.

Web-based observational research helps fine-tune e-shopping tool

Published
July 2000
Author
Jeffrey S. Robbins
Abstract
Soliloquy Inc. combined Web observational and opinion research to fine-tune Expert, its front-end interface for online vendors that allows shoppers to find what they want through a two-way interactive online conversation.

Using research to improve Web marketing

Published
July 2000
Author
Scott Young
Abstract
Marketers are spending millions to develop and promote their Web sites and marketing programs. In doing so, it is important to keep in mind that the Web puts the customer firmly in control. This article offers several guidelines for speaking with your customers and shares insights from recent Web marketing studies.

Designing medical products for the global economy

Published
November 2000
Authors
Tammy Humm Donelson and Bryce G. Rutter
Abstract
Medical products are particularly sensitive to cultural influence because the differences in medical practices throughout the world are considerable. This article discusses designing medical products for the global market using cross-cultural research, including avoiding common pitfalls, when to use cross-cultural research, defining procedures, incorporating a study control, and costs.

Eye-tracking helps fine-tune AT&T's customer service site

Published
July 2001
Authors
Sandra Marshall, Maritza DiSciullo and Tim Drapeau
Abstract
AT&T used eye-tracking to investigate how two groups of users interacted with its customer service home page.

Research provides insights to guide Web design

Published
July 2001
Author
Scott Young
Abstract
The popularity of the Internet has led to an explosion in Web sites. This article discusses Web design, including content, design, opportunity, usability and understanding the user.

Test your product before it goes online

Published
July 2001
Author
Karen Seidler-Patterson
Abstract
Creating a positive customer experience is critical to any online product success. This article discusses usability testing, including testing basics, number of participants, test locations, product team involvement and testing early.

A primer on conducting usability research

Published
January 2002
Authors
Steve Ellis and Pamela Ellis
Abstract
Users often don’t follow through on Web sites the way companies would like, the result of which is millions of dollars spent on Web site redesign. This article discusses the most important aspect of any Web site: its usability.

University of Michigan Medical Center turns to usability testing to fine-tune an informational Web Site on colorectal cancer

Published
June 2002
Authors
Debra Power, Michael D. Fetters and Mack T. Ruffin
Abstract
The University of Michigan Medical Center conducted focus groups in its development of a Web site about colorectal cancer.

Success comes from picking the right tools for the job

Published
July 2002
Authors
Nick Gould, Peter Hughes and Lon Taylor
Abstract
The usability of a Web site’s user interface is a crucial driver of business success. This article discusses how to best identify the right testing methodology for effectively and cost-efficiently uncovering and resolving potentially disastrous usability issues.

Thoughts on testing Web site usability

Published
July 2002
Authors
Steve Ellis and Pamela Ellis
Abstract
A Web site is useless if it doesn’t meet users’ needs or expectations. This article discusses Web usability, including subtleties, the myth of the non tech-savvy user and fewer clicks not always being better.

Researchers and usability engineers need that pioneer spirit

Published
January 2003
Author
Dean T. Barker
Abstract
Commercial research has evolved. So, too, has the study of human factors and ergonomics. While marketing research and usability engineering professionals often work in the same company on the same projects, they seldom do so together. This article discusses how marketing researchers and engineering professionals can start collaborating to blaze a trail together. Topics covered include commonalities of and distinctions between the two communities and reaching out and establishing a dialogue.

Conducting Web site usability research

Published
January 2004
Author
Jacob Brown
Abstract
The author focuses on how qualitative and quantitative methods can be used to test Web site usability. Both families of methods have their pros and cons and researchers may have to use hybrid approaches to get the information they need.

It's the user satisfaction, stupid

Published
January 2004
Author
Sarah Hiner
Abstract
Though corporate Web sites are not products in the literal sense, they serve as powerful brand image communicators. While companies conduct large amounts of research on their actual products and services, many err by failing to seek user input when developing or refining their Web sites - which can lead to alienated or frustrated users. The author provides a brief overview of the steps companies should take to gauge their site’s usability.