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Marketing Research Articles Related to Validations

Marketing Research Articles Related to Validations

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Surveying focus group respondents yields unexpected benefits

Published
December 1992
Author
Alice Rodgers
Abstract
Administering questionnaires at the end of focus groups can help improve facility services and weed out potential professional respondents.

Surveying collegiate Net surfers -- Web methodology or mythology

Published
July 1999
Authors
Steve Wygant and Ron Lindorf
Abstract
Though data collection via the Internet has been growing in popularity, no one seems completely sure what to make of data gathered using this medium. The most heated debate regards validity. Brigham Young University used a split-method survey of on-campus residents to test the impacts of two different methods of data collection on self-selection and sampling bias: one electronic, one paper.

Trade Talk: Notes from the MRA conference in Boston

Published
July 1999
Author
Joseph Rydholm, Quirk's Editor
Abstract
Quirk's Editor Joseph Rydholm reflects on his time and what themes he noticed at the Marketing Research Association's annual conference.

A statistical approach to security/past participation problems

Published
March 2000
Author
Herb Sorensen
Abstract
To combat respondent validity issues, conduct on-site interviews. That way you'll know exactly who you're talking to.

Minimizing the liar factor

Published
January 2003
Author
Michael Sack
Abstract
While the Internet can be a great research tool, it’s important to note that research via the Internet and about Internet use regards private behavior, which makes self-reported information highly susceptible to misrepresentation. Using a case study, this article discusses minimizing lying and finding better ways to estimate actual behavior.

Validating overnight sampling with an online research panel

Published
January 2004
Authors
Nicole Cicogna and Paul Curran
Abstract
Some researchers have wondered if the rapid pace at which online surveys can be completed has introduced some of the same problems associated with overnight phone studies. The authors argue for the use of replicate sampling, which divides the sample frame into mini-samples, which researchers work one at a time to prevent a certain type of consumer from being disproportionately represented in the final data set.

Is data from a representative online panel more valid?

Published
January 2004
Author
John J. Lewis
Abstract
The author, who works for a research panel provider, argues that different online research resources and techniques can yield very different results. Knowing the effects of these factors, some of which are outlined via a research-on-research-style report, is essential to making the correct business decisions and to taking full advantage of all the Internet has to offer.

Techniques for identifying problem respondents in online surveys

Published
July 2004
Author
Bill MacElroy
Abstract
An overview of the current thinking on how to thwart dishonest survey respondents.

Practices that minimize online panelist satisficing behavior

Published
January 2007
Author
Shawna Fisher
Abstract
The article details many steps that can be taken to thwart the efforts of satisficers, the less-than-dedicated survey respondents who are dishonest or simply benign and inattentive in providing their answers.

Comparing river respondents to panelists

Published
July 2008
Authors
Denise Brien, Melanie Courtright and Marjette Stark
Abstract
The authors conducted research-on-research to determine how, if at all, answers differed depending on how respondents were recruited and/or interviewed, whether by river sample, online panel or CATI.

By the Numbers: Protecting online survey data integrity

Published
July 2008
Author
Chris Gwinner
Abstract
The article outlines ways to handle various forms of undesirable respondents during the questionnaire design process, including the use of personal access codes, question-based verification and time-elapsed verification.

Effective qualitative research in China requires understanding of customs, cultures and techniques

Published
November 2008
Author
Steve Richardson
Abstract
In addition to a general overview of conducting qualitative research in China, the author presents tips on why certain techniques work or don't work and also offers guidelines on how to select a research firm when working in China.

How do respondent behaviors and online sample quality affect measures of ad performance?

Published
April 2009
Author
Don Bruzzone
Abstract
As part of an annual tracking survey on Super Bowl advertising, Bruzzone Research conducted a research-on-research study to gauge the effects of specific survey-taking behaviors on data quality. Three behaviors were found to have a noticeable impact: speeding, straightlining answers and failing to follow instructions.

How to make sure your physician surveys are giving you accurate information

Published
June 2009
Authors
Andrew Aprill and Matt Campion
Abstract
In online research with physicians, three parties - the doctors, the client company and the research vendor - are responsible for ensuring data quality. This article outlines steps to follow to ensure that each stakeholder holds up their end of the bargain.

Faster than a speeding survey: Part I: Rules of the road for online research with physicians

Published
June 2009
Authors
Terri Maciolek and Jeffrey Palish
Abstract
Physicians expect and should receive an enjoyable time when they take a survey out for a spin, but there are several safeguards that researchers and panel vendors must take to ensure that everyone emerges unscathed when the trip is over.

Transform your tracking studies: Take them off autopilot to increase their impact and ROI

Published
October 2009
Author
Brett Hagins
Abstract
Tracking studies are a staple in the marketing research arsenal. Drawing from a larger study of Quirk’s readers and in-depth interviews with client-side researchers, Brett Hagins offers tips on making them more effective.

Panel research providers respond to questions about their survey-invitation practices

Published
November 2009
Authors
Don Bruzzone and Jack Bookbinder
Abstract
Concerned by the number of survey invitations they were receiving in their in-boxes, researchers at Bruzzone Research and Kaiser Permanente spoke to panel research companies to learn more about the firms’ guidelines for contacting respondents.

The value of consistency auditing of online panels

Published
November 2009
Authors
Steven Gittelman and Elaine Trimarchi
Abstract
Using findings from an ongoing study of global online panels, the authors make the case for the importance of understanding the impact of sample sources on market research results.

How market research can defend false-advertising claims

Published
November 2009
Author
Joel Zeiler
Abstract
Marketing research can play a major role in resolving false-advertising claims. Here are some tips on how to get the most out of litigation research and how to make timely, objective research your best ally.

By the Numbers: Make your international phone interviews successful in any language

Published
December 2009
Author
Pam Bruns
Abstract
When conducting international telephone interviews, choose your vendor carefully, the author says. Look for experience, native-speaking interviewers, flexibility, attention to detail and the use of in-language monitoring.