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Transitioning from telephone to internet survey

We are moving an annual survey from telephone interviews to internet-based. It is an internal study (conducted by a hospital and surveying hospital physicians), and we believe respondents will be more open and willing to share negative information than they had previously been during a telephone study. Have others found this to be the case? Is there a suggested percentage change typically found when transitioning from telephone to internet questioning? Can you refer me to any journal articles?

Telephone Vs. Internet

This isn't exactly what you are looking for, but does offer some helpful suggestions.

Marc

"By the Numbers: Telephone vs. Internet data collection - a case study"

ARTICLE #20071208
http://quirks.com/articles/search.aspx?searchID=23844619

Telephone Vs. Internet

Thank you.

Transitioning from telephone to Internet

I had good luck moving our 250 managers from paper to electronic.

I currently get response rates from 50-70% (depending on the topic) which is similar to what I was getting from paper.

I found it helpful to give them the option the first time--I embedded a printable version of the survey. Alternately, you could include your link in your mailer. If you have some sort of regular corporate communication, include notice about this and make sure you state the benefits to them (not just that it will be easier to tabulate).

Sorry, I don't have any journal articles.

Transitioning from telephone to internet

Hi, Margie,
I'm posting a little late, so you may already have done your study. A few years ago I was Dir of Mktg for a children's hospital and we did the same thing; transitioned from phone to mail for physician studies. Actually, we allowed the physicians to select which methodology to use and most medical staff completed via web. We did this on both medical staff and referring physician studies. We found that the doctors were not necessarily more likely to share negative information, but that given the opportunity to write comments after their responses to the questions provided us with much more in-depth documentation of their feelings. If you'd like to talk more about how we conducted the study and what I considered the pros and cons, please feel free to contact me directly.
Laura Worick (800) 737-0755