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Data Collection Field Services

We've grouped together all the information our site contains on data collection and field services to help you quickly and easily find related articles, suppliers, events, jobs, associations, glossary definitions and more.

You can narrow the topic further by clicking on a specific field service or data collection related category below.

Tags: | Airport Interviews | Central Location Interviewing | Convention Interviews 
Data Collection Field Services | Door-To-Door Interviewing | E-mail Surveys | Ethnic Interviewing 
| Executive Interviewing | Exit Interviews | Field Audits | Field Management Services 
| Independent Field Director | Interactive Voice Response (IVR) | International Interviewing 
| Mail Surveys | Mall Interviewing | MCASI-Mobile Computer Aided Self Interviewing 
| Medical Interviewing | One-on-One (Depth) Interviews | Online Interviewing | On-site Interviewing 
| Overnight Interviewing | Personal/CAPI Interviewing | Pre-Recruit Interviewing 
| Telephone Interviewing/CATI | Testimonial Interviewing | Validations 

 

Recent Articles

Below are the 5 most recent articles on this topic. These articles were published within the last three years and are only available to registered subscribers.

Sponsored Content: Advancements in interviewing technologies: Bringing confidence to qualitative
Quester's Garrett McGuire extolls the virtues of tech-assisted interviewing in qualitative.
Sponsored Content: 11 Easy Ways to Improve Your Survey Response Rates
You can learn a lot from your customers and employees - if you can get them to fill out your survey. Surveys are a powerful and cost-effective way to not only gather information, but also identify and diagnose problems as well as uncover any new and emerging opportunities. However, one of the biggest challenges that many companies face in conducting surveys is getting enough people to take their survey (i.e. getting a high enough response rate) to ensure that their survey results are accurate. While there is no single, silver bullet for improving response rates, there are some easy steps that companies can take that, when combined, will help them improve their survey response rates. This white paper from Allegiance discusses what those steps are.
What will it take to win in the B2B sphere in 2020?
Walker’s Leslie Pagel outlines strategies for how B2B firms can align their current and future customer experience practices with the needs of their markets.
By the Numbers: 10 online sample integrity tips
From inspecting IP and e-mail addresses to post-survey telephone interviews, here are strategies for analyzing the quality of online survey samples.
How a 360-degree research approach provides a deeper understanding of the patient experience
The author outlines a research process by which pharmaceutical and health care companies can learn what life is like for patients afflicted by an illness.

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Related Articles

There are 506 articles in our archive related to this topic. Below are 5 selected at random and available to all users of the site.

Program identifies repeat respondents
The authors discuss potential dangers associated with repeat respondents in mall-based research. Ruth Nelson Research Services has put into action a program to safeguard their clients’ projects against data that results from using overly-cooperative respondents.
Using the Delphi investigative paradigm for market forecasting
The Delphi technique, which involves conducting in-depth interviews with experts in an industry or market, can be used to create accurate market forecasts.
Questionnaire testing is key to successful telephone interviewing
Before beginning a telephone study, testing of the questionnaire is important. This article discusses questionnaire testing, detailing the process.
Trade Talk: Quite the double-header
A report on how the Minnesota Twins use marketing research.
Asking the right questions in telephone interviews
When conducting a focus group, the client may ask the researcher to not focus on respondents' current behavior. This article discusses the importance of attitudinal behavior.

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