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Developing Marketing Research Surveys

We've grouped together all the information our site contains on how to create surveys to help you quickly and easily find related articles, survey companies, software, events, jobs, associations, glossary definitions and more.

You can narrow the survey design and development topic further by clicking on a specific category below.

Tags: | Gamification | Online Survey Design / Analysis | Questionnaire Analysis | Questionnaire Design / Writing
| Software-Survey Design & Analysis

 

Recent Articles

Below are the 5 most recent articles on this topic. These articles were published within the last three years and are only available to registered subscribers.

Sponsored Content: Advancements in interviewing technologies: Bringing confidence to qualitative
Quester's Garrett McGuire extolls the virtues of tech-assisted interviewing in qualitative.
Sponsored Content: 11 Easy Ways to Improve Your Survey Response Rates
You can learn a lot from your customers and employees - if you can get them to fill out your survey. Surveys are a powerful and cost-effective way to not only gather information, but also identify and diagnose problems as well as uncover any new and emerging opportunities. However, one of the biggest challenges that many companies face in conducting surveys is getting enough people to take their survey (i.e. getting a high enough response rate) to ensure that their survey results are accurate. While there is no single, silver bullet for improving response rates, there are some easy steps that companies can take that, when combined, will help them improve their survey response rates. This white paper from Allegiance discusses what those steps are.
Thoughts on how to add a strategic layer to tracking studies
We love our tracking studies but James Rohde argues that there are ways to improve their ability to do more than just track.
Assessing the value of visual scale enhancements
The author’s research-on-research study examined the impact of different scale formats on results from a technology-readiness survey.
The consequences of poorly-designed surveys
Darrin Helsel shows how to make sure your surveys are asking the right questions in the right ways.

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Related Articles

There are 226 articles in our archive related to this topic. Below are 5 selected at random and available to all users of the site.

Patients tell a New York hospital that its service matches its strong reputation
Discharged patients from Belleview Hospital were contacted by telephone two weeks after the end of their stay to take a three-minute patient satisfaction survey on their impressions of the hospital's service. The survey included categorical, interval-scale, and open-ended questions. Results from phone survey will be used to refine its written survey distributed to patients.
Data Use: How not to write a survey in the 21st century
Technology has advanced exponentially in the past three decades but our questionnaire-writing skills have not, the author argues. He cites three problems that must be avoided: missing data, collinearity and direct questions.
In pursuit of software: major programs you won't want to miss
Software has reached unprecedented levels of product proliferation. This article reviews four statistics software packages: SPSS 9.0, Systat 8.0, AnswerTree 2.0 and DeltaGraph 4.0.
Comment cards and rating scales: Who are we fooling?
Countless companies rely on comment cards and rating scales to measure customer satisfaction. This article discusses how most comment cards - and their rating scales - paint a distorted picture of satisfaction and how to revise the rating scale to obtain a more accurate measure of customer satisfaction.
By the Numbers: Why your customer satisfaction surveys are not actionable
Your internal clients are busy. To give them the customer satisfaction data they need, the authors suggest, you must make the information relevant and easy to act upon and tie it to a specific economic consequence.

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